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Welcome to the NEW Layout Design SIG Wiki!

What's a wiki?

This is the Model Railroad Layout Design SIG's online track planning and layout design library.

As time allows, we're taking content out of the old wiki at http://www.macrodyn.com/ldsig/wiki and moving it here.
No longer will the wiki be a separate site but will be integrated here into one comprehensive site.

 

Please select your topic of interest:

Hints and Tips

Category:Hints-Tips

From LdsigWiki

If you have some useful layout design tidbit, helpful layout hint, or hot planning tip, post it here!

(Over time, we'll probably add subcategories and more organization to this section. But until we get enough postings to make that necessary, just add them to the list below like this:

*[[ My Cool Tip ]]

Then click on your new entry, which will take you to your new page and allow you to post your item. Once you are finished with your item posting, add:

[[ Category:Hints-Tips ]]

To the bottom of your item post and it will automatically have a link back to this page added, and be listed in the index at the bottom of this page.

Layout Hints and Tips

Blocks

A "Block" is a group of cars that will be handled together from a location to the next place the cars are classified, interchanged, change trains or spotted at industry. The cars may be different final destinations. Blocks may be differentiated by :

  • Final destination
  • Interchange road
  • Next switching location
  • Car type
  • Industry
  • Direction
  • Next train

Blocks are identified by a block name or code:

  • Text name (Houston)
  • Alphanumeric code (HOU1)
  • Numeric code (135)

Blocks are used in classification yards to separate the cars. Each classification track may hold one or two blocks. Blocks are also used to assemble trains, a particular train sysmbol or schedule will carry only certain blocks. The blocking pattern is described in a "transportation plan" for the train. One special type of blocking, particularly used on locals, is station order blocking. The cars are blocked by the destination station and the train is assembled with the blocks in order from the front of the train to the rear of the train in the same order the train will arrive at the stations. So if a train originates at Anna and operates on the route Anna-Bess-Cloy-Dora-Eve-Fay, the train will be blocked:

Caboose-Fay-Eve-Dora-Cloy-Bess-Engines

It is also possible, that a train such as the one above may be blocked in the reverse manner as follows:

Caboose-Bess-Cloy-Dora-Eve-Fay-Engines

This will more likely be trains that run over several sub divsions where the blocks will be added and removed at crew change points by yard switchers.

Classification yards

 

Classifications yards are arrangements of tracks used to sort or classify cars. They recieve inbound trains or cuts of cars, switch them according to their outbound

blocks

and then build them into outbound trains.

Large yards may have subyards separated by function.

Arrival/Departure yard/tracks: Longer tracks designed to recieve and inbound train or cut or tracks in which an outbound is built. Large yards may have separate Arrival and Departure yards.

Classification yard/tracks: Shorter tracks used to sort or classify cars by outbound block.

City yard: small yard used to hold local industry cars.

RIP tracks: Tracks where cars are repaired (Repair In Place).

Caboose tracks: Tracks used to hold cabooses between trains, where they can be cleaned and serviced (fuel, ice, water, supplies, etc)

Switching lead: track dedicated for use by the switch engine while classifying cars. Gives the switcher tail room (room to pull back)while switching.

Scale track: track with a scale on it to weigh cars for billing purposes.

 

 

Practical Yard Design Example

 Guy Cantwell has been kind enough to provide a copy of his thoughts and actions in building a small yard on his layout. Please see the attached file for his work.

AttachmentSize
Willoughby Yard design.doc.pdf890.49 KB

Curve radius rule-of-thumb

 Here are some curve radius guidelines based on the lengths of your longest pieces of rolling stock.

2X - Some model equipment may be able to track reliably on 2X their length, but this is generally considered pushing it.

3X - Making your curve radius at least 3X the length of your longest cars gets reliable tracking around curves, but looks toylike.

4X - If you make your curve radius at least 4X, your longest cars will look much better on curves.

5X - If you make your curve radius at least 5X, your longest cars will couple easily with minimal manual fiddling of the couplers.

This measurement is based on the length of your longest car (coupler to coupler).

 

 

HO EXAMPLES

For example, an HO forty foot box car is about 6" long, coupler to coupler. Here are the curve radius guidelines if your longest cars are forty footers:

FORTY FOOT CARS
Curve Radius
2X - 12"
3X - 18"
4X - 24"
5X - 30"

If you go below an 18" radius, your cars may not track well on curves, although some equipment may still track okay down to a 12" radius. You need at least a 24" radius for your cars to not look toy-like on curves. To have reliable coupling on curves, you need a 30" radius, which would be a good minumum radius standard for a yard on a curve, for example.

However, few will have only forty foot cars as the longest cars on their layout. Here are some guidelines in HO for other more common "longest" car lengths:

FIFTY FOOT CARS
Curve Radius
2X - 15"
3X - 22.5"
4X - 30"
5X - 37.5"

SIXTY FOOT CARS
Curve Radius
2X - 18"
3X - 27"
4X - 36"
5X - 45"

EIGHTY FOOT CARS
Curve Radius
2X - 24"
3X - 36"
4X - 48"
5X - 60"

So to summarize, some cars or locos may track okay at 2X, but at 3X cars of that length will all track well, use 4X if you want things to look decent, and use 5X if you want reliable coupling on curves (like say a yard on a curve).

 

Further comments

Here's another trick you can take advantage of, too. Curves, when viewed from the inside, don't look as sharp. So for inside curves, you can drop the radius to 3.5x instead of 4x (say 27" instead of 30" for 50-foot equipment) and the curve will still look pretty good.

But outside curves (like at the end of a peninsula) look sharp and the equipment doesn't look as good, so the curves there should be as broad as possible. If you can manage it, you should use the 4x rule (at least) for those curves.

If all the cars are of similar length, you can drop to perhaps 2.5x, but if you have a mix of longer and shorter cars, you'd better go at least 3x of the longer equipment if you don't want tracking problems, or 5x of your longest equipment if you want the most reliable coupling. Widening the gauge to maximum may help with rigid wheelbase steam locos.

You may also be able to do 3x on longer equipment and get reasonable coupler performance if the couplers have been altered to allow them to swivel at least 50% of the width of the car.

To be absolutely sure what works best with your equipment, do some testing on your own, using these guidelines as a starting point.

NOTES:

 

 

Curves

 

Prototype railroads in North America measure curves by degree of curvature, not radius. The degree of curvature is measured by in the field by the offset of a 100 foot chord.

For a prototype curve:

R=Radius of the curve

D=Degree of curvature

R=50/sin(D/2)

So for a 4 degree 30 minute curve:

R= 50/sin(4 deg 30 min/2)

R= 50/sin(2 deg 15 min)

R= 50/.0392

R= 1275 feet

To convert to HO radius in inches:

Rho= (R/87)x12

Rho= (1275/87)x12

Rho= (14.655)x12

Rho= 175 inches

Typical mainline curves are in the 2-6 degree range. Sharp curves are those above 10 degrees.

 

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom and most countries that belonged to the former British Empire, prototype curves are commonly measured by radius. In pre-metric times, the radius was often measured in chains.

1 chain = 22 yards = 66 feet.

 

 

Easyspline masonite roadbed

When I started in this hobby I used Woodland Scenics foam roadbed but after reading about Joe Fugate's Easyspline masonite roadbed I decided to try it out and WOW, what a difference.

I started by adding my risers made from 1 by 2.

Image:bench10.jpg

I got the masonite splines from a local carpenter. They are made from 1/4 inch masonite and around 20 mm in height. Next time I will try to make these splines myself because I'm not 100% satisfied with the carpenter. I think it's importent to have the same size for all splines. In my case some are 20 mm, others are 22 and 21. That makes it hard to build a smooth roadbed.

Image:splines.jpg

I laminated 7 splines together to make the roadbed 42 mm wide (7 x 6). I used lots of spring clamps to hold them in place while the glue dried overnight.

Image:bench11.jpg

Here are some closeup pictures of the finishing roadbed. Use a surform plan (I used one from Stanley) to take away the glue on the top and to make the roadbed smooth.

Image:bench12.jpg

Image:bench13.jpg

Image:bench14.jpg

Next step is to glue the track directly to the roadbed with latex caulk. If you have gray ballast, use gray caulk.

Why do I like this method?

- I think this method is the best you can use for roadbed and I will never go back to any other method, never.

- It's easy to make curves and grades and it's VERY sturdy.

- You will not waste any material, one masonite board will go a long way.

- And you can use it for any scale, just laminate splines until you have the right size.

Try it out, I'm sure you will like it. Thanks to Joe Fugate for showing me this roadbed construction method.

(And thanks to Lee Nicholas for showing it to me -- Joef)

Glossary of layout design terms

 

Index by Arguments (Category)

Table of contents 

At the link below is an Index organized by Category, rather than alphabetical. It can be useful to find words related to each other.

INDEX BY ARGUMENTS

A

AAR:
American Association of Railroads. Industry group that determines interchange standards among other thing. Succesor to the ARA.

ARA:
American Railway Association. Industry group that determined interchange standards among other things. Predeccesor to the AAR.

Abutment:
A foundation designed to hold back the pressure of solid ground, such as an end pier of a bridge.

Accommodation:

A local passenger train which makes all stops.Serve all or most stations on a route. Serve as collectors

AEI Tag:
An electronic transponder located on the side of rail cars that identifies them to trackside readers.

Airbrush:
Small spray tool for fine-spray application of paints and stains with compressed air.

Air Brake System:
All of the devices and parts included in making an air brake for controlling the speed and stopping a locomotive or train. It is made up of the operating devices, the pipes, fittings and foundation brake gear.

Air Test:
The act of operating the brake valve to determine that the air brake system was operating correctly and could stop the train if necessary. (see also Initial Terminal Air Brake test)

Alley:

A clear track in a switching yard

Arrival-Track:

The track which passenger trains arrive at a terminal; or freight trains arrive in or near a yard

Articulated (Mallet):
  1. A locomotive that has one or more sets of drivers on a hinged or articulated frame to enable the locomotive to negoiate tighter curves.
  2. A Mallet locomotive. A simple articulated is a mallet which had a large enough boiler to supply all four cylinders with high pressure steam direct from the boiler. A compound mallet is a mallet which had a boiler too small to supply high pressure steam to all four cylinders at once, and used steam twice, once to the rear high pressure cylinders and the "partially used" steam would then supply the front cylinders. The best known example of a compound mallet is the N&W Y6b mallet, which "shifted" to compound operation at higher speed. Some well known simple articulated's are the UP BIG Boy, the UP Challenger, the N&W Class A, the B&O EM-1 type, and the SP AC class.

Automatic Block Signal System:
A series of consecutive blocks governed by block signals, cab signals or both, actuated by train, engine or by certain conditions affecting the track. Those conditions may include broken rails or main track turnouts not being lined for the main track.

 

B

Bad Order-Track:

A track on which cars are set to wait for repairs

Bakehead:
Fireman (because his head was near the door of firebox when shoveling coal)

Ball (of a Rail):
The head of the rail on which the wheels run.

Base:
The bottom surface of a a rail that sits on the tie or tie plate.

Benchwork:
A frame which is the foundation of a model railroad layout. L girder and open grid (sometimes called butt-joint) are two popular types.

Back Saw:
Fine toothed saw with reinforcing strap along top (back) of blade. Also called razor saw.

Backdrop:
A background mural of scenery or sky either on a wall behind the layout or on a freestanding dividers that gives the illusion of depth to the scene or obstructs the view of tracks or other itmes. A backdrop can be painted, a printed background, large photograph or a combination of media.

Ballast:
Usually gravel, cinders, or crushed rock placed between ties and around track and roadbed to help prevent the track from moving, spread load, provide bearing for ties and track, and to drain water and help control weed growth.

Balloon:

Technical term for a reverse loop.

Belt Line:
A connecting railroad between two or more railroads, so-called because it encircles a city like a belt.

Bend the Rails:
To throw or change the alignment of a turnout, change position of turnout.

Big Hook:
The wrecking crane.

Blinds:
A walk way between two passenger cars covered with either canvas or leather in an accordion shape. From the outside of the blinds to the outer edge of the cars there was a space about 24 inches wide. There was a ladder running up to the top of the car in this space and the bums would grap hold of the ladder and hold on to it. That was riding the blinds

Block:

  1. A section of track that is electrically isolated from the adjoining sections for multiple-train operation or to prevent short circuits.
  2. A section of track that is isolated for electrical control or indication.
  3. A section of track that is controlled by signals.
  4. A group of cars that are handled together from a yard, interchange or industry to another yard interchange or industry without intermediate switching. See also this TIP : [Blocks ]
  5. To switch cars into blocks.

Blue Flag:
A blue flag or signal that is placed on a car or locomotive when workers are around or under it. When a car or locomotive is blue-flagged, then it must not be coupled to or moved in any manner. The only person allowed to remove a blue flag is a person of the same craft as the one who placed the blue flag.

Board and Batten Siding:
Vertical wooden planking with small wooden strips (battens) nailed over the seams between planks.

Boxcar:

An enclosed car used for general service and especially for lading which must be protected from weather.

Brakeman:

A member of a freight or passenger train crew. His duties are to assist the conductor in any way. Brakemen (on trains) or switchmen (on yard engines) do the work on a train or yard job. They couple and uncouple cars, throw turnouts and pass signals. Brakemen get promoted to conductor. Switchmen get promoted to foremen.

Branch:
A portion of a division designated by a timetable. Rules and instructions pertaining to subdivisions apply on branches.

Brake:

  1. Brake Beam : A cross-piece in the foundation brake gear for a pair of wheels to which the leverage delivers its force to be transmitted through the attached brake head and brake shoes to the tread of the wheels.
  2. Brake Cylinder : A cast metal cylinder with a piston that is forced outward by compressed air in applying the brakes and returned by a release spring in releasing the brakes.
  3. Brake Pipe : Commonly called a train line, it is the pipe, hose, connections, angle cocks, cut-out cocks, fittings, etc., connecting the locomotive and all cars from one end of the train to the other for the passage of air to charge and control the brakes.
  4. Brake Rigging : A term commonly used instead of foundation brake gear.
  5. Brakes, Automatic : Automatic brakes are the brake controls in the locomotive that regulate the pressure of the brake pipe and apply or release the brakes for the entire train including the locomotives
  6. Brakes, Independent :Independent brakes are the brake controls in the locomotive that apply the brakes on the locomotives only. The air hose marked ACT or BR CYL enables the lead unit to control the trailing units brakes

Bumper or Bumping Post:

  1. Device that stops cars at end of a stub track.
  2. The device a loaded car crushes when it rolls off the end of a track.

Bull:
Slang for a railroad special agent, railroad police officer or railroad detective. A "cinder dick".

Butt Joint:
Wood joint where the end of one board is butted or glued directly to the second board.

 

C

Cab Control:
A means of operating and controlling one or more trains singly or simultaneously . (trains operating independent of one another.)

Cab:

  1. The control compartment of a locomotive.
  2. A caboose.
  3. Forward A steam locomotive with the engineers cab placed ahead of the boiler instead of behind it.
Caboose:

End of train non revenue car. The rolling office and living quarters for the crew of a freight train. Sometimes called crummy, bobber or way car.

Caboose-track:

Tracks used to hold cabooses between trains, where they can be cleaned and serviced (fuel, ice, water, supplies, etc)

Caliper:
Precision measuring tool for determining small dimensions between two jaws.

Camelback:
A steam locomotive with the cab astride the boiler, the fireman riding under a hood at the rear

Cant:
Amount by which one rail of a curved track is raised above the other. Cant is ‘positive’ when the outer rail is higher than the inner rail and ‘negative’ when the inner rail is higher than the outer.

Carman:

Carmen inspect and maintain the rolling stock in the yard. They inspect inbound trains for defects and bleed off the air brakes, that is, release the air from the air brake cylinders on the cars so they will roll free when switched. Any defective cars are tagged "bad order" by stapling or attaching a brightly colored tag to one of the tackboards on the car, and sent to the repair track, known as the rip track (Repair In Place). When the outbound train is set they "lace the air" or couple all the air hoses. The carmen then perform the Federally required brake test to make sure all the brakes on the train are working properly. Carmen are responsible for oiling the journal boxes when friction bearings are used. Once again any defective cars are tagged bad order, switched out and sent to the rip track. The carmen work for the mechanical department directly, but are given work priorities by the yardmaster. A car or mechanical foreman will be in charge in larger facilities. The foreman works for the Master Mechanic.

Catenary:

  1. An overhead wire system for transmitting power to a train for propulsion. It is characterized by a contact wire suspended from a "messenger" wire as opposed to a single wire typical of trolley systems. Normally catenary is used for high speed heavy duty systems
  2. Overhead trolley wires, usually used by prototype interurbans (electric-powered locomotives and self-propelled cars) with diamond-shaped current pick up devices on the roofs called pantographs.

Centipede Tender:
A high capacity tender applied to some large steam locomotives, and multiple axles attached to the frame of the tender, with the front two axles contained in a track casting and capable of swiveling. Major users of centipede tenders include New York Central and Union Pacific railroads.

Channel:
A specified frequency for communication between train and dispatcher or 2 trains. The channel numbers (07 thru 97) are shorthand methods of designating assigned radio frequencies for transmission. For example, channel 96 means to transmit on an assigned radio frequency of 161.550 mHz

Cherry Picking:

  1. Yard: Pulling only selected car from a makeup track rather than the whole track.
  2. Industries: Pulling before spotting always or handling most convenient first. Prototype had protocol for specific industries like early morning, after 5pm, and between 12-1. Customer serviced ruled here.

Chief Dispatcher:
Officer in charge of a dispatching office. Asst. chief dispatchers, dispatchers and operators report to the Chief Dispatcher. Was responsible for the safe and efficient train movements, managing the balance and flows of crews, locomotives and pool cabooses over the system. In a traditional railroad structure, they and the superintendents were the two most powerful operating officers on a railroad for day to day operations.

Cinder Dick:
(slang)A railroad special agent, policeman or detective, a "Bull".

Circuit:
The path of an electrical current.

Circuit Breaker:
A switch or fuse that automatically opens the circuit in the event of a current overload.

Class 1 Railroad:
A railroad line with annual revenues in excess of a figure set by the Interstate Commerce Commission, adjusted annually for inflation.

Classification Yard:

A freight yard where trains are broken up and made up by shifting cars with a switcher locomotive or by a hump. See also this TIP : [Classification yards].

Coaling Station:
Any building where coal for steam locomotives is stored and shovelled or dumped through chutes into the locomotives' tenders When the storage bins are elevated and the coal hoisted by conveyor belts or buckets, the structure is usually called a coaling tower When the elevated storage bins are reached by a trestle so the coal can be dumped from the cars or shovelled right into the storage bins the structure is usually called a coaling trestle.

Code (of rails):
Height of model rail as measured by thousandths of an inch. Code 83 is .083" tall, code 70 is .070", and code 55 is .055".

Commuter:

Passenger train whose primary purpose to carry people to and from work. They generally link core of large city to its suburbs

Conductor:

A crew member on a freight or passenger train in charge of the train. The conductor (on trains) or foreman (on a yard engine) is the person in charge of the crew. He is the leader of the team; the "captain" of the train. He decides what moves are to be made, when moves are to be made and how the job is to be done. The conductor is responsible for the paperwork of the train. Both the train crew (brakemen/switchmen) and engine crew (engineers/firemen) report to him. The conductor is responsible for the rules observance of all members of his crew

Consist:
The cars which make up a train; also a list of those cars. Locomotive consist is a group of engines put together to pull a train.

Coupler:
The device used to connect and disconnect locomotives and cars.

Craftsman Kits:
Are designed for the experienced modeller. These kits consist of unpainted wood, metal or plastic parts often accompanied by decals. Instruction sheets usually include assembly drawings or templates.

Creosote:
Oily liquid from coal tars used to waterproof wooden beams and piers. Simulated with black and gray paints.

Crew:
The men and women who run a train.

Crossing:

When two tracks cross each other, as in the center of a one-level figure-eight-style model railroad.Normal crossing angles are 90°, 45° and 30° but other angles were used when required by the situation.

Crossing, Grade:
An intersection between a highway and railroad tracks on the same level.

Crossover:
The pair of turnouts on parallel tracks that allow trains to travel from one track to an adjacent one.

Crummy:
Slang for caboose; also called a doghouse.

CCR:
Central Control Room, a facility from which rail system operation will be monitored and controlled.

Centralized Traffic Control (CTC):
A remotely controlled block signal system under which train movements are authorized by block signals whose indicators supersede the superiority of trains

Culvert:
A passage way under tracks for drainage of water.

Cupola:
Small cabin atop the caboose.

Current:
Rate of flow of electricity within an electrical circuit.

Curve:
Classified as:

  1. 1. Simple – one radius throughout.
  2. 2. Compound – two or more simple curves of similar radius.
  3. 3. Reverse – A compound curve of opposite directions.

Cut:

  1. A number of cars, coupled together.
  2. An excavated section through a hill allowing the tracks to remain level. When the railroad has to dig or blast through a hill or mountain to maintain a level roadbed.

 

D

Date Nail:
A small nail used by railroads from late 1800's to present used to mark the year a tie was placed in roadbed. Nails are distinctive in that each has the last two digits of placement year stamped in head. Usually found within six inches of tie end, but some are located mid tie to allow easier inspection. Rarer nails value in 100's of dollar range to collectors.

Dead-end:

  1. A track or route that terminates with no outlet.
  2. Short section running line terminating at buffer stops.

Deadhead:

  1. Movement of equipment (usually passenger cars or engines) or crews in order to position them for future use. Crews are paid, but not working while deadheading. Equipment is not being used or occupied by revenue passengers while deadheading.
  2. An empty car; a passenger riding on a pass; a locomotive travelling without cars.

DCC:
Digital Command Control

Departure Yard:

An arrangement of yard tracks in which outbound trains or cuts are placed or assembled.

Demurrage:
Charges applied to the customer due to delays in loading or unloading a car after being placed at industry.

Derail:

  1. To leave the rails.
  2. A device placed short of clearing point on a track to prevent a car or engine from fouling main track, derailing said car or engine if not removed to permit safe passage.

Detour:

  1. To operate a train on an alternate route; to reroute.
  2. To operate a train on another railroad to bypass an obstruction or interuption on its normal route.

Diamond:
A special track work item that allows two railroad tracks to cross each other at grade. (see also Crossing)

Die Cast:
Casting process where molten metal or other liquid is forced into a mould.

Dispatcher:

A railroad employee who coordinates all train movements; he may issue specific orders to keep traffic moving. The dispatcher monitors and co-ordinates the movement of trains over main lines and sidings. He may directly control block signal, CTC or interlocking systems or may direct operators that control those systems.

Division:
A portion of a railroad considered as an operational and administrative unit, typically under the supervision of a superintendent.

Dog bone:
Model railroad arrangement consisting of two reversing loops connected together. Also known as" Dumb Bell".

Double Hung Window:
Window with two sliding sashes that move vertically next to each other.

Double Ended Siding:

A length of track with switches at each end. See also: (Passing Siding)

Double Slip Switch:
Used only where space is limited, combines the functions of a crossing and turnouts to allow any one of four routings.

Double Track (DT):
Two main tracks, on one of which the current of traffic is in a specified direction, and on the other in the opposite direction.

DPDT (Double pole-double throw):

  1. An electrical switch that has two connections or poles, with two position or capable of completing one of two alternative circuits.
  2. An electrical slide or toggle-type switch that is used for reversing the flow of current to the tracks by wiring across the back of the switch. Some types have an "off" position midway in their throw and these "Center-off DPDT" switches are often used for wiring model railroads to allow two-train and two-throttle operation.
    See also SPDT SPST (Single pole swithes)

Drill:
To switch cars in a yard.(see also Drill Track)

Drill Track:

A track connecting with the ladder track, over which locomotives and cars move back and forth in switching.

Dry Brushing:
Process of rubbing paint only on the surface of a material without any flowing of the paint. A brush is dipped in just a little paint the excess wiped off, and the nearly "dry brush" is used to rub pigment on an object. Used for weathering.

Drop:
Switch a car behind the engine onto an adjacent track when the engine can't run around the car. The engine speeds up, uncouples from the car and pulls past the switch, the switch is lined for the other route and the cars roll past the engine.

Dual Gauge:
Track able to accommodate trains of two different wheel gauges. Usually achieved by the laying of a third length of rail, one being common to both gauges. Very common in Europe, and in model railroading in the U.S. such as HO and HON3.

Duckunder:
A passage underneath layout benchwork requiring ducking or crawling ( bend down and go under ) to gain access to another part of the layout.

Dummy:
A small auxiliary signal used to control unusual movements such as a set back into a yard from a main line. Implies a complete stop and wait for a manual operation from the panel. Usually ground mounted lens: two whites for proceed and red/white for stop. Also known as dolly or dwarf.

Dynamic Braking:
A method of train braking where the kinetic energy from the train movement generates current at the locomotive traction motors, and is dissipated in a resistor grid on the locomotive.

E

Earth:
Electrical connection to complete a circuit; Also called Ground.

Easement:
A portion of track on a spiral curve that connects a curve of constant radius to a section straight track, or Tangent track. Also known as a Transition Curve. It changes the radius from that of the curve to that of the tangent track, and the rate of change in radius is constant along the easement.

Elevation:

  1. 1) Drawing showing one side only of a structure.
  2. 2) Vertical distance above an established level or grade.
Engineer:

A crew member who controls the locomotive. He is in charge of the train in the conductor's abscence. The engineer is responsible for safely operating the train over the railroad. He is second in command of the train. He must know the territory and the rules, plus the operation of the engine and the air brake system. He is responsible for handling the train to minimize slack action in the train (the banging back and forth in the train due to cushioning devices and slop in the couplers) and to minimize fuel usage

Enginehouse:
A building in which locomotives are serviced and/or stored

Engine Yard:
The yard in which engines are stored and serviced.

End-of-train device (EOT):
A telemetry device, required by federal law, that is installed at the rear of a train to relay information to the locomotive engineer.

End-to-End:
Model layout consisting of a length of track with a terminal at each end. Point-to-Point.

Extra:

A train not authorized by timetable schedule. It may be designated:

  • Extra - For any extra train except work extra, the movement of which is authorized in a specified direction.
  • Work Extra - For any extra train authorized by Form H train order, the movement of which may be in either direction within specified limits.
  • Passenger Extra -- for passenger train extra. (not in all rulebooks)

F

Facing (Turnout):
A turnout with the points facing traffic or the direction of movement.

Fascia:
Board nailed vertically to the end of roof rafters; sometimes used for gutter support.

Feeder:
Power connection from the power pack to track and elsewhere on model railroad; Also a short branch road feeding traffic to a mainline.

Ferro-Equinologist:
Ferro- meaning iron plus equine- meaning horse give one who studies iron horses, i.e., a railfan

Fiddle Yard:

See Staging yard. A hidden track or series of tracks used by modellers to make up or break down trains, lifting the equipment by hand.

Fill:

  1. to add cars to a train, to pick up a block of cars.
  2. An earthworks to raise the level of the tracks above the surrounding terrain.
Fireman:

Crew member whose job it is to keep the fire and steam up in a locomotive; on a diesel he services the motor. Firemen in the steam era were responsible for the mechanical care of the boiler and it's appliances. The engineer was responsible for the running gear. The engineer is responsible for the fireman's actions. They fuel and water the engine outside of terminals oiled steam engines and inspect engines for wear and defects. Once diesels came into widespread usage, fireman became 'engineers in training'. Firemen get promoted to engineers

Flagging:
Protection of a train or location against movements towards that train or location. Traditionally governed by Rule 99. Typical instructions would require that when a train stopped a flagman would provide protection by walking away from the train the distance required by the rules (flagging distance, typically 1-2 miles), placing two torpedoes on the rail and then returning half the flagging distance to the train. The flagman would remain at that position prepared to stop an approaching train with a red flag or a fusee. The flagman would continue to flag until recalled to the train or relieved.

Flagman:

The rear brakeman. The great country music singer Jimmie Rodgers used to brag about being a flagman. Reason? Because flagmen had to know how to read so they could understand train orders.

Flange:
The portion of any railroad wheel that guides that wheel down the rails. The flange extends around the circumference of each railroad wheel as its largest diameter.

Flatcar:

An open car without sides or roof.

Flextrack:
Flexible sections of track used on a layout. In "HO" it usually comes in straight, three-foot long sections which can be bent as needed. Larger Flex Track such as large scale "G" need to be bent with a rail bender before it is assembled. Other kinds of track are sectional (rigid pieces of straight and curved track that come with train sets) and hand laid (built with handmade ties, rail, and spikes).

Form:
Used to describe the different varieties of wording and purposes for train orders:

  • Form A: Meets.
  • Form E: Time orders
  • Form F: Sections
  • Form G: Extra trains.
  • Form H: Work extra trains.
  • Form L: Annuling an order.

Various forms could be combined together in one train order.
Form D (modern): A form used in receiving written permission to occupy track in DCS sections of railroad lines. Permission is given by Train Dispatcher or Operator.

FRED:
Flashing Rear End Device -- end of train telemetry device

Free-lance:
Modeling that does not closely follow a specific prototype railroad, location or type of operation.

Freight Agent:

The station freight agent accepts requests from customers and prepares waybills, bills of lading as well as pull/spot lists.

Freight Yard:

A group of tracks used for switching, classification or storage of freight cars.

Frequency:
The number of times per second an alternating current reverses its direction.

Frog:

The X shaped rail assembly where rails cross in a turnout or crossing.

Fusee:
A small flare that burns for a set amount of time, typically 10 minutes. It is used to warn trains that there is a train ahead of them and to pass hand signals. A train which slows to a speed at which it may be overtaken or less than one half the track speed (depending on the rule book) will drop a fusee behind it at regular intervals as a warning to following trains. A train which is moving at a restricted speed must stop before passing a fusee and must remain stopped until the fusee burns out or wait 10 minutes (depending on the rulebook). A train that is moving that encounters a lit fusee must stop and wait until the fusee burns out if it can be seen or wait 10 minutes if it can't be seen.

G

Gap:
A break in the rails to electrically isolate some portion of the track from another to prevent short circuits or to allow for multiple-train operation on the same stretch of track.

Gandy Dancer:
A railroad track worker. Name came from the Gandy Mfg Co. in the 19th century that made a lot of track tools.

Gauge:
The spacing of the rails as measured from the inside of one rail head to the next. The "standard gauge" for most American railroads is 4 feet 8-1/2 inches; this distance was also once the standard center-to-center spacing for wagon wheels. Narrow gauge is any track spacing less than standard. Common examples are 3 ft., 2 ft., and 1 meter gauges. Wide gauge is a track spacing larger than standard. Some common examples are 5 ft gauge and 6 ft gauge. Gauge and scale may be combined in a shorthand notation. On3 means 0 scale (1/4" = 1'0") with a 3'0" space between the rails. H0n2-1/2 means an HO scale model (3.5mm=1'0") but the rails are spaced 2'6" apart.

GCOR:
General Code of Operating Rules. Rulebook adopted by most of the railroads west of the Mississippi in 1985.

Goat:
Slang expression for a locomotive, usually a small yard switcher.

Gondola:

A freight car with sides but without a roof.

Grade:
The angled rise or fall of the track so it can pass over another track or so it can follow the rising or falling contour of the land. In N. America is is expressed as a percentage which is the ratio of the ride over distance (1 ft rise in 100 feet of distance = 1% grade)

Grain:
The direction and arrangement of fibres in wood, card stock or stratified stone.

Grade Crossing:
Where a street or highway crosses the railroad. Also where two tracks cross each other.

Gravity Yard:

A yard where gravity assists in the spotting and classifying of cars whereby they move along under their own momentum. Also called a Hump Yard.

Ground foam:
Synthetic foam rubber ground up and dyed for use as a texture element in scenery.

Ground Throw:
A mechanical device (usually done manually) which will change the position of a turnout, and simultaneously change the position of the signal mounted on top of the ground through.

Guardrail:
An additional rail used on the inside of rails to help wheel flange follow the proper route (as in a turnout or crossing), or to keep derailed cars on the track structure (as on a bridge).

 

H

Hardshell:
A scenery base made by dipping paper towels in plaster and laying them over a light support structure.

Haul, Short:
The act of routing freight such that the haul takes maximum advantage of the originating railroad, at the disadvantage of another railroad which had to be used to carry the freight part of the way to its destination. The railroad which suffered the disadvantage was said to be "short hauled."

Head-end Cars:
The front of the train. The cars that are normally coupled to the front of a passenger train, including express refrigerator, baggage and mail cars.

Headshunt:
A head shunt, or shunting neck, is a track running parallel with the main line, facing the yards. It is arranged so that shunting can take place without interfering with the main line. In N. america it is a lead or drill track.

Headway:
The time interval between trains running in the same line.

Helix:
A climbing or descending curve which turns around an axis like a corkscrew. Used on multilevel layouts to allow trains to go from one level to another in a relatively small space.

Helper:
The locomotive that is added to a train to supply extra power that may be needed to surmount a steep grade.

Highball:

  1. A signal given to proceed at maximum permissible speed.
  2. To not perform a work event.

Homasote:
A pressed paperboard often used for roadbed.

Hopper:

An open-top car with pockets, or hoppers, opening on the underside of the car for unloading bulk commodities.

Hostler:

Men who service and sometimes move locomotives from one servicing facility to another to prepare the locomotive for the engineer. Hostlers are the craft that handles light engines in the yards. Hostlers (named for the people that took care of horses at an inn) may take the power off inbound trains to the engine service tracks. They supply the engines with fuel, sand and water. Hostlers move engines around inside the engine service and repair facilities. They may take the engines back out to the outbound train. There may also be helpers or herders with hostlers. Hostlers typically come from the ranks of fireman or engineers. Hostler helpers are engine service employees who handle the switches for hostlers. Herders are switchmen who handle switches for hostlers. Most hostling crews cannot handle any cars, except maybe cars of supplies for the roundhouse or service track. Inside hostlers may only work within the limits of a roundhouse or shop area; building consists of engines, fueling, watering and sanding locomotives. Outside hostlers may work both inside and outside the mechanical areas in the terminal area. Outside hostlers are used to move power within a terminal area. Outbound and inbound road train crews may move their power between the roundhouse and their train or hostlers may do this. Not all terminals have outside hostlers. All hostlers work for the roundhouse foreman while in the mechanical facilities and the outside hostlers work for the yardmaster when outside the mechanical areas. These people come under the Federal Hours of Service Act and are considered train service employees.

Hot Box:
On friction bearings, an overheated journal bearing.

House Track:

A track entering, or along side a freight house. Cars are spotted here for loading or unloading.

Hump:
An elevated section of track down which freight cars can be coasted for classification in the yards below.

Hump Yard:
  1. A yard where cars are switched by shoving them over a small hill or hump and allowing gravity to roll them into the appropriate track.
  2. A yard where gravity and powered switches sort incoming trains onto correct tracks. DO NOT HUMP signs are placed on cars that must not use a hump yard because of cargo restrictions or car age. Marshalling yard with artificial mound or hump over which cars are propelled and gravitate to correct siding and position in the yard.

Hydrocal:
Trade name of U.S. Gypsum Corporation for a very hard dense plaster. Much stronger than plaster of Paris or patching plaster.

 

I

Incline or Inclined Plane:
A method of moving railway equipment up steep grades using a cable hoist. The cable can be winch driven or assisted by the weight of a car traveling downhill (also called a funicular system).

Initial Terminal Air Brake Test:
Air test required on all trains before they depart their initial terminal. The trainline must be charged to the required air pressure. A brake reduction is made. The train line is checked for leakage. Every car in the train is checked to ensure the brakes have set on every car. The brakes are released and every car is inspected to ensure the brakes have released on every car.

Interchange:

  1. A section of track or several tracks where one railroad connects with another so trains or individual cars can move from one railroad to the next.
  2. The act of exchanging cars between railroads.

Interlocking:
A system of mechanical or electrical controls so only one train can move through a junction of two or more tracks like a crossing or yard throat.

Intermodal:
Freight traffic that refers to containerization of freight for easy transloading to different modes of transportation.

 

J

 

K

Kicking or kicking a cut:

  1. To accelerate a cut of cars and then uncouple one or more of those cars, allowing them to roll into a track on thier own momentum.
  2. switching cars "on the fly" without going into the track, stopping, uncoupling, and then reversing the locomotive back onto the lead for the next move. The purpose of kicking was to allow a string of cars being sorted or classified to be sent in ones, twos, threes down a series of classifications tracks on the same lead without the need to stop, back up, and then go forward again.

Kitbash:
To combine parts from two or more kits to produce a model different from both. Sometimes called cross-kitting, customizing or converting.

Kitbashing:
Taking one or more model railroad kits (often structure kits) and changing the construction process or combining parts to make a unique model.

Knuckle:
The movable portion of the drawbar coupler.

 

L

L-Girder Benchwork:
Benchwork made of two or more L girders, angle with the flange horizontal and on top. Joists are attached to the top of the girders and the roadbed is either attached to the top of the joists or on risers above the joists.

Ladder:

A series of sidings parallel to each other with a set of linked switches for access. Term for marshalling yard or siding layout where series of points on switches follow each other giving leads off a straight line to one side.

Ladder Track:
A track connecting a number of parallel sidings or stubs in a yard or terminal.

LCL:
Less-than-carload lot; freight shipments that are too small to require an entire car. Small shipments were accumuated into a single car.

Lead Track:

Trackage connecting a yard with the main line.

Limited:

Passenger train. Only main stations are serviced. Emphasis is on comfort, speed and convenience (see also : Accomodation, Commuter)

Loop:

Continuous circular connection between up and down lines at terminal station or yard enabling trains to reverse direction without releasing locomotive.

 

M

Mile Post:
A post or sign on pole each mile along the track that shows the distance from a predefined location such as a major rail terminal.

Main Line:
(slang) The most heavily trafficked routes of the railroad. (also Main Iron, Main Stem, Main Track, etc.) – Through trackage; restricted by rules to travel only by scheduled trains or those trains with train orders or on a schedule.

Main-Track:

The track extending through yards and between stations upon which trains are operated by time table or train order or both, or the use of which is governed by block signals.

Mallet:

Pronounced "Malley" (rhymes with "alley"). See "Articulated".

Maintenance-of-way (MOW):
The employees, rolling stock or structures that are directly associated with maintaining the railroad, structures or bridges.

Marshalling Yard:

Area where cars are sorted, assembled and marshalled into trains. A switching or classification yard.

Modules:
Small sections of model railroads designed for portability, that have a standard end configuration so they can be interconnected with other sections built to the same standard. Can be joined with other modules to form operating layouts.

MOW:
Maintenance Of Way

Multilevel car:

A long flatcar designed with one or more deck levels in addition to the car's main deck; used to haul new automobiles and trucks.

 

N

NMRA:
National Model Railroad Association.

Normal position:
The position or route of a switch when lined for the main track or primary route. Typically the tangent route through the switch.

 

O

Official Railway Equipment Register:
See ORER.

Official Railway Guide:
Document that lists public schedules of passenger and freight trains, stages, rail ferries and packet boats. Also may include maps, lists of connections and offices.

On the Fly:

  1. Switching cars without having the locomotive come to a complete stop after each move. This was done to speed the process. A good crew could switch a "cut" of 10 to 12 cars along a multi-track lead without the locomotive ever coming to a complete stop.
  2. To perform an action without stopping, as in a crew picking up orders on the fly or changing crews on the fly.

Open Grid Benchwork:
Benchwork made of rectangular frames that are attached together to form a layout. The road bed may be attached to the top of of the grid itself or raised above the grid on risers. The grids may be of a uniform size (length, width or both) or may vary according to the design.

Operation:
Running trains on a layout in a way that stimulates real railroad activity.

ORER, Official Railway Equipment Register:
Quarterly publication that list equipment in service on N. American railroads, their number series, initials, ownership and dimensions. Also contains clearance diagrams, interchange rules and descriptions of car types.

Originating Station:
The first station on each subdivision from which a train is authorized to occupy the main track.

 

P

Panel Desk:
Or board on which operating switches for points and signals are mounted. In N. America, a control panel.

Paired Track:
When two railroads own single track lines, they may reach an agreement whereby one railroads track services both roads in one direction, while the other railroads track services both roads in the other direction.

Passing Siding:

A siding specifically for passing of trains in the same or opposite direction; may be several miles long so that neither train is required to stop. See also "Double Ended Siding".

Pick-Up Freight:
Train which stops at intermediate points to pick up and drop off freight cars on an as required basis.

Piggyback:
TOFC or Trailer On a Flat Car. Originally used when truck trailers were loaded onto flat cars for shipment by rail.

Pocket:
Portion of track within a terminal on which a train may stand for a period of time

Points:
The portions of a turnout that move to change the track's route from the main line to a siding. The point where the rails actually cross is called the "frog" part of the switch.

Private Car/Business Car:
Coaches owned by private individuals/railroad (for use of corporate officials or supervisors). Cars were positioned at end of trains and train crew were to remain off these cars except in performance of duties. Crew was also to see that occupants of these cars were not disturbed at all costs

Proto-freelance:
Describes a layout concept that combines prototype ("real-life") scenes and elements with freelanced (fictional) elements. This includes extending a prototype railraod into territory it did not actually serve, but could have; creating an alternative history that extends the life of a "fallen flag" railroad; and many other combinations.

Prototype:
The term used to describe the full version that any model is supposed to duplicate.

 

Q

Quill Drive:
A drive system common on electric engines where a motor drives a circular ring with "fingers" that fit between the spokes of the drivers. A quill system was used on the noted class GG-1 electric engines of the PRR.

 

R

Radio Control:
A method of operating and controlling locomotives by means of radio signals transmitted through the air or by means of a carrier control basis through the track.

Rail Weight:
The number of pounds per yard that rail weighs. Currently rail is being rolled at 112 to 145 pounds per yard

Rail Joiner:
The pieces of metal that join two lengths of rail together. They slide onto the ends of the rail on a model railroad; they are bolted to the rails on the prototype.

Red Eye:
(slang) A red signal or horizontal semaphore arm requiring the train to stop and proceed with caution.

Reefer:
A common slang term for a refrigerator car

Rerailer:
A heavy metal casting which was designed to be placed near a derailed wheelset of a locomotive or car, for the purpose of guiding the wheelset back onto the rail. Steam locomotives and early diesels usually carried rerailers on hooks on the tender trucks or frame (steam locomotive) or on the frame of a diesel.
Also known as a "rerail frog". There were several different designs of rerail frogs, some were designed to be used "outside" where the flange of the wheel had to pass over the top of the rail be rerailed, some were designed to be used "inside" where the tread of the wheel just had to reach the ball of the rail amd some were designed to be used either inside or outside. A notable design looked like a large wide V that straddled the rail and could be used either inside or outside. It was commonly called a "bat wing frog."

Restricted Speed:

  1. (older version)A speed that will permit stopping short of train, engine, railroad car, stop signal, derail or switch not properly lined.
  2. (modern version)A speed that will permit stopping within one half the range of vision; short of train, engine, railroad car, stop signal, derail or switch not properly lined, looking out for broken rail, not exceeding 20 MPH.

Some older versions include "looking out for broken rail". Some versions may not have a speed associated with them or a different speed.

Restricted Track:
A track section where train speeds are reduced.

Reversing:
A station where train reverses direction of travel . May be at normal dead end or terminal station.

Reverse movement:
A movement in the direction opposite the train was previously authorized to move.

Reverse position:
The position or route of a turnout when lined for other than the main track or primary route. Typically the diverging route through the turnout.

Right of Way:
The property and the track owned by the railroad The land on which a railroad is built; also precedence given to one train to proceed before another.

Rip-Track:
  1. An area of the maintenance yard where equipment is stored while waiting for repairs. In model railroading a few sections of track by a freight yard or on a shelf above the workbench.
  2. The track on which rolling stock is repaired.

Road Bed:
A layer of earth or gravel which provides a foundation for ties and rail. In model railroading wood, cork, plywood, Homosote and other materials are used.

Road Foreman of Engines:
A railroad official responsible for training and rules compliance, particularly of engineers and fireman. They teach and evaluate engineers for rules compliance, train handling and fuel efficiency. Some railroads now call them "managers of operating practices".

Runaround-Track:

A pair of turnouts arranged on parallel tracks in yard ladder that let engine get by train it just pulled in.

Run Through:
An agreement between two or more railroads that allow the locomotives and caboose of one railroad to continue through intact on the route of another. The railroad owning the engines is compensated for their use with "horsepower hours" which is the horsepower of the unit multiplied by the number of hours it is on the second road.

 

S

Sanborn Map:
Founded in 1867 by D. A. Sanborn, the Sanborn Map Company was the primary American publisher of fire insurance maps for nearly 100 years.Sanborn fire insurance maps are the most frequently consulted maps in both public and academic libraries. See also this page: [Sanborn Map].

Section:

  1. Operating Rules: One of two or more trains running on the same schedule, displaying signals or for which signals are displayed.
  2. M of W: A portion of a railroad maintained by a gang.

Section Gang:

The section gang maintained the ballast, ties and rails (ie. the infrastructure) of the railway. Heavy locomotives in movement cause a lot of shifting and it was the section gang's responsibility that tracks stayed in gauge and could safely handle the traffic. They were often called "gandy dancers", from the rhythm of their work.

Service Yard:
A yard whose main function is to service engines, repair cars and provide heavy maintenance and rebuild functions. Normally located at division points or central point of smaller railroad

Shay:
A type of steam locomotive using a gear drive in place of a side rod drive, designed by Ephraim Shay in the late 1800's, and produced by what became the Lima Locomotive Works. This locomotive was designed for logging and other operations where heavy grades and sharp curves existed and prevented the use of side rod type locomotives

Siding:
A track auxiliary to the main track for meeting or passing trains.

Slippery Track:
A highly greased track near the roundhouse or back shop where a newly rebuilt locomotive could be run in without going anywhere, and without calling an engine crew or pilot.

Special Agent:
A railroad ploice officer or detective, (slang) a "Bull" or "Cinder Dick".

SPDT SPST:

An electrical slide or toggle-type electric switch. Classified as :

  1. Single throw (ST). Used to interrupt / close a circuit
  2. Double throw (DT). Used to "switch" between two "path"

Some DT types have an "off" position midway in their throw. See also DPDT (Double pole switch)

Spline:

  1. A mechanical device used for drawing curves.
  2. A key on a drive shaft.
  3. A mathematical function used for Interpolation between points.
  4. A type of railroad car used in intermodal service consisting of a central spline and crossbeams for the wheels and the front. Minimal construction provided a very lightweight car.
  5. A thin vertical piece of wood, masonite or homasote, typically 8 to 12 feet long used to build elevated roadbed. See also this TIP : [Easyspline-masonite-roadbed ]

Spotting:

  1. The act of placing a car in a specific location on a track.
  2. Placing a car at industry.

Spur:

  1. A single ended track.
  2. An industry track.
Staging tracks:

Tracks used to represent the rest of the railway system. A staging yard is regarded as off-scene; it may hold multiple complete trains, and may also be subject to direct human intervention (fiddling, see Fiddle yard ) to re-arrange trains.

Storage Yard:
A yard whose main function is to store cars, sometimes with cleaning and maintenance facilities

Stub Track:
A form of side track connected to a running track at one only. It may be protected at the other end by a bumping post or other obstruction.

Superelevation:
A track is said to be superelevated when one rail is higher than the other through a curve. Raising one rail tilts the train as it passes over, banking it into the turn much like an airplane. This allows the train to transit the curve at higher speeds and greater comfort. Prototype railroads compute the amount of superelevation for a given curve from the speed the will be used through the curve.

Switch:

  1. To sort railcars in a yard.
  2. To place or remove cars from industry.
  3. European term for Turnout.
  4. Electric command device (see : SPDT SPST, DPDT )

Switching lead:
Track dedicated for use by the switch engine while classifying cars. Gives the switcher tail room (room to pull back)while switching.

 

T

Team Track:
A public spur or siding used by industries that do not have their own siding

Terminating Station:
The last station on each subdivision to which a train is authorized to occupy the main track.

Timetable:

  1. Employeee - a listing of the stations and train schedules (times trains are authorized to depart those stations), with additional information that affects the movement of trains. An employee timetable schedule conveys authority to occupy the main track.
  2. Public - a listing of passenger trains operating and the times they are scheduled to depart stations. A public timetable does not convey authority to occupy the main track.
  3. The original method of train control was through a published timetable of scheduled meeting places for trains where priority was through class (1st, 2nd, extra etc.) then by direction

Tie:
(also "sleeper") A rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. Ties are members laid transverse to the rails, on which the rails are supported and fixed, to transfer the loads from rails to the ballast and sub grade below, and to hold the rails to the correct gauge. Traditionally, ties have been made of timbers, but concrete is now widely used, steel has been used, and plastic has been tried.

Timetable and Train Orders:
A system of authorizing trains to occupy the main track using a timetable or modified by train orders.

Torpedo:
A small explosive charge that is placed on the rails that expodes when the wheels of a car or engine passes over it that serves as an alert to the train crew that there is a train or obstruction ahead. If was used to comply with flagging instructions.

Trackage Rights:
An agreement between two railroads which allows trains of one railroad to operate over a portion of the other railroad.

Track Pan:
A water filled trough placed between the rails at certain locations on a railroad's main line, each trough having a length of up to 2500 feet, for the purpose of adding water to the tender of a steam locomotive via an air activated scoop which was located on the underside of a locomotive tender. The use of a track pan arrangement prevented a need to stop to obtain water. Users of track pans included the New York Central, the Pennsylvania, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroads in the US.

Trailer:
A cargo-carrying highway vehicle without automotive power.

Train Order:

  1. A system of structured messages that direct the movement of trains other than those movement authorized by timetable.
  2. A message changing the meeting point between two trains. For movement of trains not provided by timetable train orders will be authorized by, and over the signature of the director of train dispatching or chief dispatcher.

Train Order Signal:

  1. (US) A fixed signal that indicates whether a train has to obtain a clearance at that station. Train order signals may have 2 or 3 indications, may be a semaphore position arm, solid or flashing light.
  2. Fixed signal near the entrance to a river tube, bridge or at stations with moving platforms. Two lunar white mean Proceed without orders according to rules, two red mean Stop, stay and call for orders. Also: a signal at a station that indicates by its position or by its color, that train orders are to be delivered to a train, or that no orders are to be delivered

Trainmaster:
An operating officer responsible for managing train operations in a terminal or over a portion of a division. He reports to the superintendent. Train crews and engineers report to him. Clerical forces and agents report to him regarding railroad operating issues. He is the line officer that investigates accidents and derailments, coordinates the operations at and accident scene and conducts disciplinary investigations.

Transportation Plan or T-Plan:
A plan or listing which describes the train schedules, blocking plans, connections, connection cut-offs, locomotive requirements, service requirements and other operational parameters of a railroad. It is used to design the train service of the railroad.

Turntable:
A rotating steel or wooden bridge to turn locomotives or cars and/or to position them to align with the tracks in the engine house or round house.

Turnout:

  1. Where two diverging tracks join.
  2. A piece of track that allows a train to go from one track to another.

Referred to by number. See above: Turnout Number

Turnout Number:
The ratio of the length of the tangent track to an equal unit of space between the tangent track and a point on the branch track. For example, a no. 6 turnout spreads one foot for each six feet of forward travel measured from the frog.

 

U

UCOR:
Uniform Code of Operating Rules. There are at least two UCOR rulebooks, one developed by Canadian roads and one by Midwestern US roads (MP, TP, CEI, CRIP, MKT, FWD, et al).

USRA:
United States Railway Administration. The USRA took over and operated American Railroads during World War I; was responsible for certain long lasting and "standard" locomotive designs.

 

V

Varnish:
Term used to refer to passenger trains, dating back to the late 19th century and the varnished passenger coaches of the luxury trains such as those employed on the LV's Black Diamond and the C&O's Sportsman

 

W

Walk Around:
A layout designed for physically following a train around the layout while operating.

Weathering:
Process of painting, staining or colouring to show aging, use or effects of weather on a model.

Way Car:

  1. A freight car carrying local shipments.
  2. A caboose.
Way Freight:

A freight train that switches cars at most towns along its route from terminal to terminal. Also called a peddler freight.

Web:
The vertical portion of a rail between the head or ball and the base.

Wing Rail:
A continuous running rail that forms the obtuse angle of a diamond crossing. Also a running rail from switch heel towards nose which is then set to form check rail past nose of common crossing.

Wye:

  1. A turnout where both routes diverge from the centerline of the track. (see also "Y turnout").
  2. Also, the triangular shaped track (in plan view) where trains can be reversed.

Whistle Signals (Engine): (* means a short blast of the whistle or horn) (- means one long blast)

  • * apply brakes, stop
  • * * answer to any signal not otherwise provided for
  • * * * when standing, back
  • * * * * call for signals
  • - test train brakes
  • - - release train brakes
  • - - - when running, stop at next passenger station
  • - - - when standing, train parted
  • - - - - recall flagman from south or west
  • - - - - - recall flagman from north or east
  • - * * calling attention to another train that signals are displayed for a following section
  • - * * * flagman protect the rear of train
  • * * * - flagman protect the front of train
  • - - * approaching meeting or waiting points
  • - - * - approaching crossing at grade
  • - * * - answer to yellow temporary reduced speed flag placed 1 1/2 miles in advance of restricted tracks

 

X

 

Y

"Y (Turnout)":
A equilateral switch. A switch whose routes each diverge from the track centerline at equal angles.

Yard:
A group of tracks where switching chores are performed for storage, classification, making and breaking up of trains, etc.

Yard Clerks:

Clerks process the inbound trains, making a list of the train and filing the waybills. A waybill is more or less the ticket for a car to ride a train. They would keep track of the switching and make lists of the classified tracks. When an outbound train was finally assembled or "set", they would make the train list and gather the waybills. Clerks called "Weighmasters" weighed cars and recorded the information on the waybills. The clerks that worked out in the yards checking for car/track positions were called mudhops. Clerks (Cashiers) also handled the money and financial affairs for the railroad. There were several types of offices: passenger (handled tickets, baggage, express and mail), freight (billing, car orders, switch orders, customer car delay fees or demurrage and diversions) and yard (weighing, interchanging with other RR's, preparing train and switch lists) in major locations. These functions may be combined in small towns, down to a combination depot with only an agent performing all of these tasks. Clerks also are the ones who "call" or notify the crews that they are to report for duty for a train. Clerks work for a chief clerk on their shift. The Agent is in charge of clerical operations and works for the Trainmaster.

Yard Lead:
The portion of track before the yard ladder used to assemble the train. In theory the yard lead should be as long as the longest train but if shorter, it provides interesting work for the yard engine

Yard Limits:
A portion of main track designated by yard limit signs and by timetable, train order Form T or track bulletin, which trains and engines may use as prescribed by Rule 93.

Yardmaster:

Railroad employee in charge of a yard operation. Yardmasters are in charge of the overall operation of a yard. They decide which cut will be switched and what cars will be switched into each track. The switch crews work directly for them. They also direct traffic in the yard tracks and on the main track in yard limits. They give trains movement instructions for their area of responsibility. In some smaller yards a switch foreman will be given the title of "footboard yardmaster" and he will have the responsibility to direct the overall yard operation, while still being a yard engine foreman. Complex terminals may have multiple yardmasters (hump, trim, east, west, etc.) and when there are multiple yardmasters a General Yardmaster is in charge. If the yardmasters are agreement employees, seniority in craft determines who gets the assignment. General Yardmaster or yardmasters might be non-agreement on some roads. The yardmasters work for Trainmasters and the General Yardmasters

 

Z

Revised by Enzo Fortuna 10:24, 3 April 2007 (PDT)

Last revised by Dave Husman

 

 

Sanborn map

Sanborn Insurance Maps were made of 12,000 cities and towns across the United States by the Sanborn Map Company beginning in the 1867 for the purpose of assessing fire risk and setting insurance rates, and they were the primary American publisher of fire insurance maps for nearly 100 years. They include not only moderately detailed information about the location of structures, railroad tracks and streets drawn at a scale of 1"=50'-0", but they also include the height and material of the structures, location of doors and windows, cranes and other equipment, storage tanks, use of the building, etc. An invaluable tool when researching for a model railroad, they, along with photographs, track charts and ICC Valuation maps, can give a very accurate rendering of what was happening in most any urban area of the country begining around 1900. These maps can generally be ordered via Interlibrary Loan from your local public, school or university library if you have a library card. Some libraries will have the maps for the local area or state on hand in hardcopy format, and maps that are borrowed from other libraries will generally be on microfische or microfilm. Copies can be made for personal use.

The map below shows a part of the Bethlehem Steel Shipbuilding Yard along the Hudson River in Hoboken, NJ. The railroad tracks shown belonged to the Hoboken Shore Railroad, and run out on a 600' long pier. All the different phases of shipbuilding work can be identified in the map from rigging to copper smithing to painting.

Image:Scan001.jpg

Timeline-Freight cars

1883 - Safety Appliance act passed.
1900 - Cars required to be equipped with air brakes and knuckle couplers.
1911 - Safety Appliance Act amended to include ladders and grabirons.
1928 - Wood draft sills banned from interchange.
1933 - Type E or F couplers required on all new cars.
1933 - Rotary uncoupling levers required on new or rebuilt cars.
1934 - AAR created from ARA.
1937 - AB brakes required on all new cars.
1937 - Geared handbrakes are required on new or rebuilt cars.
1938 - Billboard cars banned.
1940 - Arch bar trucks banned in interchange service.
1945 - Wood running boards outlawed on new cars.
1948 - Plate B adopted, maximum height of 15 ft 1 in.
1954 - K brakes are banned in interchange service.
1957 - Trucks with cast journal boxes required (Andrews type trucks banned).
1958 - Cast iron wheels banned on new cars.
1959 - Allied Full Cushion trucks banned.
1963 - Plate C adopted, maximum height of 15 ft 6 in.
1966 - Roof running boards are banned.
1967 - High mounted brake wheels on new cars are banned.
1968 - ACI labels are installed.
1970 - Cast iron banned in interchange.
1970 - No underframes over 50 years old premitted.
1972 - ACI labels no longer required.
1972 - Roller bearings required on all 6 1/2 x 11 journals.

Train length and layout design

How you design your layout's passing sidings, yard tracks, and return loops can have a major impact on train length. In this tip we discuss briefly what the issues are.

You can have trains longer than passing sidings and yard tracks and can deal with them, although they will slow things down a lot. But a train longer than a reverse loop will not work -- the laws of physics says two objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time — so the front of your too-long-for-the-reverse-loop train will collide with the back of the train once it reaches the end of the loop!

With passing sidings, the key is opposing trains. As long as one of the two opposing trains will fit, the other train can be any length — you can get the trains past each other with a bit of advance planning. But if both trains are too long for the siding, you'll need to do a double-sawby maneuver. Such a maneuver is fun once in a while but it would get old if it was standard operating procedure. This means passing siding length has a major impact on train length if you want opposing traffic to flow smoothly.

With visible yards on the layout, a too-long train can always "double the yard", which means you split the train in two and it takes two yard tracks. This practice is not uncommon on the prototype so it could be an acceptable operating procedure as long as you are aware that it will slow down yard operation somewhat.

Finally, too-short staging tracks can be a problem, since it will make you "double the yard" in staging as well. Requiring trains to do this in a visible yard on the layout is one thing, but requiring this in staging is going to get old, so the recommendation is don't. Staging track length has a major influence on train length.

More information

Layout design analysis article on Joe Fugate's Siskiyou Line web site

Uncoupling methods

One decision that a person designing a new layout must consider is how he/she plans to uncouple cars on the railroad. Since the vast majority of model railroaders at this time use either Kadee couplers or a clone, I will discuss the two major ways of uncoupling them.

The first way is by the use of a magnet positioned underneath or between the rails. The couplers to be uncoupled are then stopped over the magnet, slack run in allowing the knuckles to move to opposite sides and allowing the engine to move one car away from the other. These magnets may either be of the permanent or electrical variety. The pro's of this method is that no one needs to reach into the layout to uncouple cars and risking the possibility of damage to either the railcars or the layout scenery. The con's of this system is that you are limited in where you can uncouple, i.e. no magnet no uncoupling, and if your train takes slack at the wrong place or stops with cars over a magnet you can get unscheduled uncoupling (can be avoided with electromagnets or movable magnets). The magnets will allow you to set you couplers for delay so that you can push a car to a desired spot, this will not work on a track with several spots that need to have cars not coupled together when properly spotted thereby requiring multiply magnets on a track.

If you are going to install magnets, it is best to decide where they will be needed early in the design stage or at least by the time of track construction as they will affect sub roadbed and roadbed. Location must considered, as placing a magnet closer than a car length to a curve can hinder uncoupling (possibly worse on curves bending to the left when coming off the straight section of track.

The second popular way to uncouple is with a manual aid such as a pick which may be as simple as:

  • flat blade between the knuckles
  • special tool between the knuckles
  • pointed tool (skewer) between the knuckles
  • rod from above to catch and move the "air hoses"
  • Z rod from the side to move the "air hoses"
  • two magnets (wands a la Rix) that can be lowered between next to the couplers.

The major pro of the pick system is that it allows for uncoupling at any location on the layout that can be reached. Many operators feel that this helps to simulate a brakeman working the cut lever on a real railcar. The con's are that reaching into the scene destroys the illusion of the model railroad, i.e. no large hand from the sky with large telephone pole uncouples on a real railroad, plus if not careful one can damage cars or scenery.

One thing that must be stated is that the use of either system is not exclusive; you can have both magnets and use a pick to uncouple cars. This will always be a matter of personal taste of the layout owner.

Verttical Curves

The topic of vertical curves has been generating a lot of discussion lately, with a variety of standards being proposed -- both with and without experiential or computational justification. The purpose of this page is to list and discuss the various standards that various groups and individual modelers have established, along with the scale, gauge, and type of equipment used. Of particular interest will be designs that did not work for some reason. Please feel free to add your own experiences here, so long as there is enough data for it to be compared.

We need your help enhancing this stub with more information! Please click [edit] and enhance this posting with your insights.

LD SIG Organization

This section of the wiki has content pertaining to the operation and maintenance of the LD SIG organization.

LD SIG Bylaws

Table of contents 
  1. Article 1. Name
    1. Section 1. Organization Name
    2. Section 2. Organization Status
  2. Article 2. Nonprofit Purposes
    1. Section 1. IRC Section 501(C)(3) Purposes
    2. Section 2. Specific Objectives and Purposes
  3. Article 3. Members and Dues
    1. Section 1. Members
    2. Section 2. Voting
    3. Section 3. Dues
    4. Section 4. Good Standing
  4. Article 4. Directors
    1. Section 1. Number
    2. Section 2. Qualifications
    3. Section 3. Powers
    4. Section 4. Duties
    5. Section 5. Term of Office
    6. Section 6. Compensation
    7. Section 7. Place of Meetings
    8. Section 8. Meetings
    9. Section 9. Notice of Meetings
    10. Section 10. Quorum for Meetings
    11. Section 11. Majority Action as Board Action
    12. Section 12. Conduct of Meetings
    13. Section 13. Vacancies
    14. Section 14. Nominations and Elections
    15. Section 15. Nonliability of Directors
    16. Section 16. Indemnification by Corporation of Directors and Officers
  5. Article 5. Officers
    1. Section 1. Designation of Officers
    2. Section 2. Qualifications
    3. Section 3. Election and Term of Office
    4. Section 4. Removal and Resignation
    5. Section 5. Vacancies
    6. Section 6. Duties of Officers
  6. Article 6. Committees
    1. Section 1. Chairmanship of Committees
    2. Section 2. Elections Committee
    3. Section 3. Other Committees
  7. Article 7. Meetings of the Corporation
    1. Section 1. Annual Meeting
    2. Section 2. Conduct of the Meeting
    3. Section 3. Quorum
    4. Section 4. Other Meetings of the Membership
    5. Section 5. Membership Action by Mail-in Ballot
  8. Article 8. Conflict of Interest
    1. Section 1. Conflict of Interest
  9. Article 9. Internal Revenue Code 501(c)(3) Tax Exemption Provisions
    1. Section 1. Limitations on Activities
    2. Section 2. Prohibition Against Private Inurement
  10. Article 10. Dissolution
    1. Section 1. Transfer of Assets
  11. Article 11. Amendment of Bylaws
    1. Section 1. Procedure for Amending
    2. Section 2. Proposers of Amendments
    3. Section 3. Proper Notice
  12. Article 12. Construction and Terms
  13. Adoption of Bylaws

Article 1. Name

Section 1. Organization Name

The name of the organization shall be Layout Design Special Interest Group, Inc. hereinafter to be called Layout Design Special Interest Group.

Section 2. Organization Status

It shall be a non-profit, non-sectarian, non-partisan, non-stock corporation.

 

Article 2. Nonprofit Purposes

Section 1. IRC Section 501(C)(3) Purposes

This corporation is organized exclusively for one or more of the purposes as specified in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Section 2. Specific Objectives and Purposes

The specific objectives and purposes of this corporation shall be:

  1. To act as a forum for the members' exchange of information and ideas, and to develop improved ways for hobbyists to learn the art and science of layout design.
  2. To provide leadership for planning, developing, coordinating, and expanding the knowledge of planning model railroads; and
  3. To promote, develop, support and encourage participation by the public in model railroading.

 

Article 3. Members and Dues

Section 1. Members

Membership shall be open to all with an interest in railroading.

Section 2. Voting

Each member shall have one vote on any matter on which a vote of members is taken.

Section 3. Dues

Members shall pay dues as established from time to time by resolution of the Board of Directors.

Membership includes four mailed issues of the Layout Design Journal.

Section 4. Good Standing

A member is in good standing so long as said member is, according to the books and records of the corporation, entitled to receive one or more issues of the Layout Design Journal.

 

Article 4. Directors

Section 1. Number

The Board of Directors shall consist of five (5) members.

Section 2. Qualifications

Any Member, provided he or she is at least eighteen (18) years of age, may serve as a Director of the corporation.

Section 3. Powers

The business affairs of the corporation shall be managed by a Board of Directors who shall exercise or direct the exercise of all organizational powers. The Officers and members of the Board of Directors shall use their best efforts to carry out in good faith the purposes and exercise the powers so as to further the experience and appreciation of model railroading and in particular layout design.

Section 4. Duties

It shall be the duty of the Directors to:

  1. Perform any and all duties imposed on them collectively or individually by law, by the Articles of Incorporation, or by these Bylaws;
  2. Appoint and remove, employ and discharge, and, except as otherwise provided in these Bylaws, prescribe the duties and fix the compensation, if any, of all officers, agents and employees of the corporation;
  3. Supervise all officers, agents and employees of the corporation to assure that their duties are performed properly;
  4. Meet at such times and places as required by these Bylaws; and
  5. Register their addresses with the Secretary of the Corporation, and notices of meetings mailed or electronically transmitted to them at such addresses shall be valid notices thereof.

Section 5. Term of Office

The term of office for any elected Director will be for three (3) years, and terms shall be staggered so that one or two Director(s) is(are) elected each year. In the year 2004 five Directors shall be appointed by the incorporator, two for a term expiring in 2005 two for a term expiring in 2006 and one for a term expiring in 2007. A Director may serve as many consecutive terms as he or she is elected to.

Section 6. Compensation

Directors shall serve without compensation, but nothing herein contained shall be construed to preclude any director from serving the corporation in any other capacity and receiving compensation therefore.

Section 7. Place of Meetings

Meetings shall be held at such place or places as may be designated from time to time by resolution of the Board of Directors.

Section 8. Meetings

Meetings of the Board of Directors may be called by any member of the Board, or, if different, by the persons specifically authorized under the laws of Connecticut to call meetings or special meetings of the Board. Such meetings shall be held at the place designated by the person or persons calling the meeting.

Section 9. Notice of Meetings

Unless otherwise provided by the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or provisions of law, the following provisions shall govern the giving of notice for meetings of the Board of Directors:

  1. Meetings
    At least one week's prior notice shall be given by the Secretary of the corporation to each Director of each meeting of the Board. Such notice may be oral or written, may be given personally, by first class mail, by telephone, E-mail or by facsimile machine, and shall state the place, date and time of the meeting and the matters proposed to be acted upon at the meeting. Meetings may be held by conference call.
  2. Waiver of Notice
    Whenever any notice of a meeting is required to be given to any director of this corporation under provisions of the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or the laws of Connecticut, a written waiver of notice signed by said director, whether before or after the time of the meeting, shall be equivalent to the giving of such notice to said director.

Section 10. Quorum for Meetings

A quorum at any Board meeting shall be a majority of the entire Board of Directors. An act by the majority of the Board present at any meeting at which there is a quorum shall be the act of the whole Board, except as otherwise provided by law or by these bylaws. The vote by majority of those present at any duly constituted Board Meeting shall be sufficient to authorize action.

Section 11. Majority Action as Board Action

Every act or decision done or made by a majority of the Directors present at a meeting duly held at which a quorum is present is the act of the Board of Directors, unless the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or provisions of law require a greater percentage or different voting rules for approval of a matter by the Board.

Section 12. Conduct of Meetings

Meetings of the Board of Directors shall be presided over by the President, or, in his or her absence, by the Vice President, or if no such person has been so designated, or, in his or her absence, by a person chosen by a majority of the Directors present at the meeting. The Secretary of the corporation shall act as secretary of all meetings of the Board, provided that, in his or her absence, the presiding officer shall appoint another person to act as Secretary of the Meeting.

Meetings shall be governed by the then current edition of Roberts' Rules of Order, insofar as such rules are not inconsistent with or in conflict with the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or with provisions of law.

Section 13. Vacancies

Vacancies on the Board of Directors shall exist (1) on the death, resignation or removal of any Director, and (2) whenever the number of authorized Directors is increased.

Any Director may resign effective upon giving written notice to the President, or the Board of Directors, unless the notice specifies a later time for the effectiveness of such resignation. No Director may resign if the corporation would then be left without a duly elected Director or Directors in charge of its affairs, except upon notice to the Office of the Attorney General or other appropriate agency of Connecticut.

Directors may be removed from office, with or without cause, as permitted by and in accordance with the laws of Connecticut.

Unless otherwise prohibited by the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws or provisions of law, vacancies on the Board may be filled by approval of the Board of Directors. If the number of Directors then in office is less than a quorum, a vacancy on the Board may be filled by approval of a majority of the Directors then in office or by a sole remaining Director. A person elected to fill a vacancy on the Board shall hold office until the next election of the Board of Directors or until his or her death, resignation or removal from office.

Should a Director miss three consecutive meetings of the Board without good cause, he or she shall be considered to have resigned.

Section 14. Nominations and Elections

Nominations for the members of the Board of Directors will be by the Elections Committee, a committee consisting of one Director and two non-Director members of the Layout Design Special Interest Group. The committee shall present the slate to the Board of Directors in April of each year. Notice of these nominations shall be mailed to the Members not less than twenty-five calendar days prior to the Annual Meeting. Elections shall be held at the Annual Meeting.

  1. The Elections Committee shall solicit nominations from the membership and nominees' qualification statements for screening by the Committee.
  2. The Elections Committee shall prepare ballots for the election of Directors by mail. The ballots shall provide for write-in candidates by the membership and be accompanied by nominees' statements. The elections committee, at its sole discretion, may edit candidates' statements for brevity and accuracy.
    Note: It is currently the policy that candidates' statements will be edited only for length.
  3. No less than 90 days before the annual meeting, the Elections Committee shall distribute the ballots and nominees' edited qualification statements by mail to the members or include them in a timely LDSIG publication.
  4. The ballots will indicate the receipt deadline to be counted for that election.
  5. The candiate(s) receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected to the Board.

Section 15. Nonliability of Directors

The Directors shall not be personally liable for the debts, liabilities, or other obligations of the corporation.

Section 16. Indemnification by Corporation of Directors and Officers

The Directors and officers of the corporation shall be indemnified by the corporation to the fullest extent permissible under the laws of Connecticut.

 

Article 5. Officers

Section 1. Designation of Officers

The officers of the corporation shall be a President, a Vice President, a Secretary, and a Treasurer. They shall be appointed by the Board annually at the first meeting of the Board following the Annual Meeting but not later than fourteen days following the Annual Meeting.

  1. In the event of death, resignation, or incapacity of the President, the Vice President shall become the President for the remainder of the term.
  2. Other vacancies shall be filled, as provided in Article 5, Section 5, Vacancies, of these Bylaws.
  3. The Board of Directors, by a two thirds (2/3) vote of the entire Board at a meeting duly called for the purpose, may for any cause whatsoever at any time remove one or more members of the Board of Directors elected by the members.
  4. Any vacancies on the Board shall be filled by vote of the Board of Directors for the unexpired term.

Section 2. Qualifications

With the exception of the office of President, any member may serve as an officer of this corporation, provided he or she is at least eighteen (18) years of age. Only a Director may serve as President of the corporation.

Section 3. Election and Term of Office

Officers shall be elected by the Board following the Annual Meeting of the corporation. Each officer shall hold office until he or she resigns or is removed or is otherwise disqualified to serve, or until his or her successor shall be named and qualified, whichever occurs first.

Section 4. Removal and Resignation

Any officer may be removed, either with or without cause, by the Board of Directors, at any time. Any officer may resign at any time by giving written notice to the Board of Directors or to the President or Secretary of the corporation. Any such resignation shall take effect at the date of receipt of such notice or at any later date specified therein, and, unless otherwise specified therein, the acceptance of such resignation shall not be necessary to make it effective.

Section 5. Vacancies

Any vacancy caused by the death, resignation, removal, disqualification, or otherwise, of any officer shall be filled by the Board of Directors. In the event of a vacancy in any office other than that of President, such vacancy may be filled temporarily by appointment by the President until such time as the Board shall fill the vacancy. Vacancies occurring in offices of officers appointed at the discretion of the Board may or may not be filled as the Board shall determine.

Section 6. Duties of Officers

The various officers shall have the powers and duties that customarily appertain to their respective offices, including those hereinafter provided for and, in addition, such powers and duties as the Board of Directors may from time to time designate and confer.

  1. President
    The President shall preside at all meetings of the Board and of the Membership. The President shall have general charge and supervision of the affairs of the corporation, and shall be responsible for seeing that the resolutions and actions of the Board are carried into effect.
  2. Vice President
    The Vice President shall supervise such committees as the Board may designate. The Vice President shall preside at any meeting where the President does not preside.
  3. Secretary
    The Secretary shall act as secretary of all meetings of the Board and shall keep the minutes thereof and shall see that all notices required to be given are duly given or served. In the absence of the Secretary the minutes shall be taken by a person designated by the presiding officer.
  4. Treasurer
    The Treasurer shall have the care and custody of the funds of the corporation and shall handle and disburse the same under the direction of the Board of Directors. All funds of the corporation shall be deposited in the name of the Corporation in such banks as the Board of Directors may designate. The Treasurer shall keep or cause to be kept proper books of account showing all monies received and distributed and all assets and liabilities of the corporation and at least once each year provide a statement of income and expenses of the Corporation to the Board of Directors. The books of record shall be audited at least once a year by a person or entity appointed by the Board of Directors.

Article 6. Committees

Section 1. Chairmanship of Committees

The President shall appoint the chairperson and they may appoint the members of each committee, which may include individuals who are not Directors. With the exception of the Elections Committee, each committee shall serve at the pleasure of the President and shall have such authority and shall perform such duties as the Board of Directors shall from time to time hereafter determine.

The chairperson of each committee has the authority to appoint as many committee members as necessary for the committee's function. The committee members and those persons serving the committee in any capacity shall serve at the pleasure of the chairman.

Note: It is currently the policy that the President may also appoint and remove committee members. It is not the sole prerogative of chairpersons.

 

Section 2. Elections Committee

The Elections Committee shall consist of one Director and at least two non-Director Members. The President shall appoint the chairperson of the Committee. A quorum of the Elections Committee shall consist of a majority vote of those members present and voting. Reasonable notice of the date, time, and place of each meeting shall be given by mail, phone, or otherwise.

The Elections Committee shall nominate candidates for the Board of Directors. The Committee shall select individuals who are broadly representative and reflective of the needs of all interests served by the Layout Design Special Interest Group.

Section 3. Other Committees

The Board of Directors may create additional committees from time to time for such purpose and with such powers and duties as the Board determines.

 

Article 7. Meetings of the Corporation

Section 1. Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting shall be held at a place designated by resolution of the Board of Directors. Members shall be notified by mail, or in the LDJ at least sixty days prior to the Annual Meeting of the actual day, time and location of the meeting. At this meeting the Members shall consider reports of the affairs of the corporation and transact such other business as may be properly brought before such a meeting.

Section 2. Conduct of the Meeting

Meetings of the membership shall be presided over by the President, or in his or her absence, the Vice President. If no such officer(s) has been so designated, or in the absence of both the President and Vice President, then a person chosen by a majority of the Directors present at the meeting shall preside over the meeting. The Secretary of the corporation shall act as secretary of all meetings of the membership, provided that, in his or her absence, the presiding officer shall appoint another person to act as Secretary of the Meeting.

Meetings shall be governed by the then current edition of Roberts' Rules of Order, insofar as such rules are not inconsistent with or in conflict with the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or with provisions of law.

Section 3. Quorum

A quorum for the annual meeting for all membership meetings and those actions taken by mail-in ballot of the membership, shall be the lesser of 10% of the membership or 15 members.

Note: It is currently the policy that the quorum for all membership meetings except the annual meeting shall be the lesser of 10% of the membership or 30 members.

Section 4. Other Meetings of the Membership

Additional meetings of the membership may be called by the Board upon 60 days notice mailed to the membership to consider issues which may require the approval of the members.

Section 5. Membership Action by Mail-in Ballot

In place of an additional meeting of the members described in Article 7, Section 4, the membership may approve or disapprove of those matters requiring approval of the members by submission of a mail-in ballot. The Board shall prepare a ballot which describes the matter(s) for consideration, allows the members to indicate approval or disapproval, and provides a reasonable deadline for receipt to be counted. If the Board receives a sufficient number of ballots to constitute a quorum, the action decided by a majority of the ballots shall be considered as an action taken by a quorum of the members at a membership meeting.

Elections of Directors by mail shall be governed by Article 4, Section 14.

 

Article 8. Conflict of Interest

Section 1. Conflict of Interest

Directors shall disclose to the Board any conflicts of interest which arise, and no elected Director shall vote on any matter which would involve a conflict of interest. In the event that a Director questions whether a conflict exists, the issue shall be decided by a majority vote of the elected Directors present and voting, provided that the Director in question shall not vote.

 

Article 9. Internal Revenue Code 501(c)(3) Tax Exemption Provisions

Section 1. Limitations on Activities

No substantial part of the activities of this corporation shall be the carrying on of propaganda, or otherwise attempting to influence legislation [except as otherwise provided by Section 501(h) of the Internal Revenue Code], and this corporation shall not participate in, or intervene in (including the publishing or distribution of statements), any political campaign on behalf of, or in opposition to, any candidate for public office.

Notwithstanding any other provisions of these Bylaws, this corporation shall not carry on any activities not permitted to be carried on (a) by a corporation exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or (b) by a corporation, contributions to which are deductible under Section 170(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Section 2. Prohibition Against Private Inurement

No part of the net earnings of this corporation shall inure to the benefit of, or be distributable to, its Directors, officers, or other private persons, except that the corporation shall be authorized and empowered to pay reasonable compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the purposes of this corporation.

 

Article 10. Dissolution

Section 1. Transfer of Assets

In the event that this organization should be dissolved for any purpose whatsoever, all assets of the Layout Design Special Interest Group, upon concurrence of the Board of Directors, will be transferred a 501(c)(3) organization that promotes model railroading. None of the assets will be distributed to any member, officer or Director of this organization.

 

Article 11. Amendment of Bylaws

Section 1. Procedure for Amending

These Bylaws may be amended at any duly noticed meeting by the favorable vote of the members, in good standing present and voting thereon, providing notice of such an amendment shall have been included in the notice of the meeting.

Section 2. Proposers of Amendments

Amendments to the Bylaws may be proposed by the Board of Directors or, by the lesser of 10% of the membership or 15 members.

Section 3. Proper Notice

Written notice of a meeting at which amendments to the Bylaws are to be considered shall contain the proposed change(s) and shall be mailed to members at least 60 days prior to such a meeting.

 

Article 12. Construction and Terms

If there is any conflict between the provisions of these Bylaws and the Articles of Incorporation of this corporation, the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation shall govern.

Should any of the provisions or portions of these Bylaws be held unenforceable or invalid for any reason, the remaining provisions and portions of these Bylaws shall be unaffected by such holding.

All references in these Bylaws to the Articles of Incorporation shall be to the Articles of Incorporation, Articles of Organization, Certificate of Incorporation, Organizational Charter, Corporate Charter, or other founding document of this corporation filed with an office of the state of Connecticut and used to establish the legal existence of this corporation.

All references in these Bylaws to a section or sections of the Internal Revenue Code shall be to such sections of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as amended from time to time, or to corresponding provisions of any future federal tax code.

 

Adoption of Bylaws

The undersigned being the initial incorporator of this corporation, hereby adopts the foregoing Bylaws, consisting of 9 pages, as the Bylaws of this corporation.

(signed) Vincent Gallogly
Date: 21 December 2004

 

The above Bylaws were amended by the membership in July 2007.

(signed) Bruce Metcalf, Secretary

LD SIG Staff

Audit Committee

Scope

(not yet defined}

Duties

(not yet defined)

Bylaws Committee

Scope

(not yet defined)

Duties

Create Bylaw Amendment proposals on:

  • Expansion of the BOD to 7 members
  • Creation of the position of Vice President and duties
  • Provision for mail-in elections
  • Appointment of committee members by the chairs of the respective committees
  • Removing the amount of the dues from the Bylaws

Connecticut Resident Agent

Scope

(not yet defined}

Duties

(not yet defined)

Election Committee

Scope

The committee shall present the slate of nominees for the office of Director to the Board of Directors in April of each year.

Duties

The committee shall conduct the election at the annual membership meetings and report the results to the President as soon as possible thereafter.

Events Department

Scope

(not yet defined)

Duties

(not yet defined)

Long Range Planning Committee

Scope

"Long Range" is defined as 10 years.

Develop a Long Range Plan (both Strategic & Tactical) that includes:

  • current position
  • LDSIG role in hobby
  • 501c3 tax, accounting, and legal issues
  • tax liabilities
  • membership levels/targets/retention
  • public outreach
    • research
    • awards
    • education
    • contests
  • volunteer recruitment
  • publications
    • payments to authors
    • employees vs. contractors
    • comp issues
    • electronic publication & distribution
    • advertising
  • PR
  • special events
    • conventions
    • local meets
    • compensatory: services and fees for volunteers
  • member input solicitation
  • budgeting
    • based on LRP
    • non-member reveue
    • Board reimbursement

Duties

  • Submit a descriptive status report to the Board before Thanksgiving 2006, including at least the interim purposes, duties, and powers of the Publications Dept., its Department Head, the LDJ Committee, and it's Chairman.
  • Draft a proposed online LDJ policy.
  • Draft a proposal for the scope of the Research Dept.
  • Draft a proposal for the scope of the Education Dept.
  • Draft a proposal for the scope and duties of an Administrative & Planning Dept. to include the Audit, Bylaws, Connecticut Resident Agent, Incorporation, Long Range Planning, Member Discussion Group, Nominating, and Rerail Committees.

Member Discussion Group Committee

Scope

Solicit member input through group discussions on:

  • Activities
  • Publications
  • Internet & telecommunications
  • Membership development
  • Volunteer development
  • Long range planning
  • Research & development
  • Member services and member database
  • Education (pedagogy)

Duties

Submit a report annually by convention time.

National Convention Committee

Scope

To oversee all aspects of the LDSIG National Convention. To select committee members to perform the work of the Committee, as needed. To select a Chairman for each year's convention to handle local affairs.

Duties

Report as soon as possible, but not later than 31 July 2006, on number of layouts, distances, travel times, grouping, and potential for expanding layout tour to more than one day, at the Detroit Convention.

Create a set of policies and procedures for the conduct of our national convenions, including:

  • Meet and greet session
  • Picnic
  • Layout tours
    • Selection of layouts
    • Maps
    • Signs
  • Banquet site selection, arrangements and cost
  • Banquet speaker
  • Honors, awards and recognition
  • Carpooling and rental auto availability coordination, prior to and at the convention
  • Distribution of parking information
  • Promotion of activities, prior to and at the convention
  • Formalized SIG Room sign-in procedure, including hotel and member contact information while at the convention
  • Use of the LDSIG website
  • Promotion of clinics covering the subject of Layout Design, and especially those presented by LDSIG members
  • SIG Room activities
  • SIG Room set-up and tear down
  • Displays
  • Guidance for exhibitors
  • Consultation Table
  • Administrative matters
  • Conformance with 501.c.3 status
    • Site arrangements
    • Resolution of scheduling conflicts with other SIGs, clinics, activities, etc.
    • Budgeting
    • Member identification
  • Room sharing
  • NMRA relations and contacts
    • Data received from the National
    • Collections of funds
  • Sale of SIG materials through the ‘Company Store’
    • Collections of funds
    • Returns
  • Sale of SIG materials in the SIG Room
  • Contests
  • Comp policy

Rerail Committee

Scope

  • To survey former members asking for feedback about their reasons for dropping their membership.
  • To survey convention attendees for feedback on activities.
  • To survey members about publications.
  • To provide reports to the Board.

Duties

(not yet defined)

Plan Critiques

Post your track plan/layout design here if you would like to have members of the LD SIG give you a critique. Once you have added your track plan or design here, also go add a topic thread to the LD SIG Forum with the same name as your layout page: HO - Siskiyou Line - Joe Fugate and mention you've posted a new design to the wiki layout critique section. You'll get more traffic if you also post a direct link to your track plan wiki page here in your forum message.

To post your plan here, click Add child page, below. Name your plan as SCALE - Layout name - your name and then edit away!

HO - Frisco River Divison - Cape Girardeau & Southwestern - Keith Robinson

Please take a look and tell me what you think.  This layout is an attempt to reproduce what was in Cape Girardeau, Mo  in 1950 with a focus on switching, supported by through-train operation from north staging (St Louis) or south staging (Chaffee).  The MoP action was local from Scott City into the west end of Cape Girardeau.  The yard and mains belonged to the Frisco with Frisco servicing everything other than the MoP spur into west Cape.  The MoP had track rights from the MoP junction with the Frisco, into the Frisco yard (for servicing west Cape).  Marquette Cement had a large limestone quarry across the main as did Federal Materials (crushed limestone).  Marquette had their own GE 44ton engine that also hauled clay cars out of the river bottoms to the plant on a single track.  Facing point and trailing point switches are illustrated as they existed.

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HO - Tempe Industrial Lead - Michael Powell

I'm still trying to find a prototypical pike, one that is managable to build but interesting to operate. I've based this idea on a number of visits I've made to the actual location, plus refering to the 2002 UP track charts, and of course hours of peering at Google Earth and Bing Maps.

A potential 16' x 10' purpose built shed could be available for this pike...

Givens and Druthers

  1. Southern Pacific, 1990s time slot (can accomodate current scene with patched or UP locomotives)
  2. Phoenix metro area
  3. motive power GP38/40 or 40/60 combos (want to include SD40s and 45s, but can't figure out how to include a worthwhile section of mainline)
  4. minimum #6 turnouts
  5. traffic - general in reefers, box cars, lumber on center beams, plastic pellets in bulk hoppers, cement hoppers, fuel tankcars
  6. DCC control, single operator
  7. domino construction
  8. no tricky benchwork and hidden staging (any staging out in the open)
  9. minimal scenic effects

This bit of urban freight railroad wanders south from Tempe Junction, and finally peters out a little way south of the Loop 202 Santan Freeway…

On the way, it visits various industries that see a handful of cars each. Not many cars, but plenty of variety – tanks, coil cars, box cars, lumber racks, shorty cement hoppers, 100t hoppers for plastic pellets… The plan stays pretty faithful to the prototype, including having the spurs correctly oriented. West Chandler has been flopped though, so the tank tracks are on the east side of the lead not the west. Having the spurs face the right way should help operations be more prototypical – now all I have to do is find out how the prototype operates!

Starting from Tempe Jct, follow the line south (clockwise) round the room until you arrive at West Chandler Industrial Park. Each time you’re facing the pike, south is to your right and you’re facing east. I’m absurdly pleased at this bit of geographical sincerity, as I’m sure it will help the sense of a line that goes from somewhere to somewhere else, not just round a room. Theoretically, if a 100 foot+ linear space became available, I could unplug the LDEs, substitute some straight ‘fillers’ for the bendy bits, and replicate the branch in all its spindly glory.

Ops remain a bit of a mystery – I’ve heard traffic on this line, but always late at night/early hours of the morning. I’m guessing the profusion of grade crossings may have something to do with that, but I really don’t know. And just how many trains traverse this line? One a day? Three a week? I’ve never seen anything moving, just the switchers slumbering over at McQueen and various freight cars lolling about in the sun.

My biggest concern with this pike is that basically there is only one out and back local to operate, which strikes me as a bit limiting in the amount of real estate that is available. I've tried a few ways to combine a piece of the mainline so that I can run haulers that interchange with the Industrial Lead, but have gotten stuck.

So, that's where things lie at the moment, over to you guys!

HO - Torsney/Grohs RR - Bruce Torsney

Trainboard WEST ViewTrainboard EAST View

I'm more interested in an "operational" layout as compared to a "Scenery"  oriented one. My track plan is from Atlas's "Big Track Plan Book," HO35, Berkshire Valley Route; the size is 4 x 12 feet. I have included an original schematic and photos of my own upgrades.

I have revamped the yard to include an arrival/departure track. I did this by simply adding two turn-outs to the two longest tracks. I also added five storage and a run around track. On the opposite side of the twelve foot section, from the yard and original reverse track,  I've added a second "reverse track." I've removed two of the short 9 inch bridges, in favor of one 18 inch one. I did this to open up this "East-end Property" for some kind of switching operation. At the West-end (west=left) of the property, inside the second loop I would like ideas for some type of "action" industry to place there. For my last track modification to the original 4 x 12 layout, I want to reconnect the West end of the yard back to the Main Line.

I also upgraded about half of the switch machines to Tortoise. Each upgrade has an "electrified frog" and bi-colored LEDs to show the switch position.

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HO-Union Pacific Freelance-Jermie Arnold

This layout is inspired by a layout I liked in MR Magazine.  I have adjusted a couple of things, but it still has some issues.  The Main line is red, with Yard and station lines in Brown and staging in Yellow.  The Red line is a graded line of about 2.5-3% most of the way.  I have added a blue line that decends back to the 0" elevation.  Any thoughts or criticisms would be helpful.   Also this layout will be in my garage and I would like to lift it up out of the way, possibly in two halfs during the winter months.  Any thoughts on storage?  Thanks for taking the time to look this over. 

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Museum Plan 1

See attached of a plan for the space I spoke of in a previous entry that showed the available space and dimensions. If I know what I was doing, I could have combines them...

 

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N - PRR Catskill division - Erik Wejryd

This is a trackplan representing a part of a freelanced extension of the PRR from Wilkes-Barre PA to Schenectady NY.

The PRR wanted - at least in my history writing - to gain more traffic from the New England area. At the end of the 19th century, all bigger cities in the northeastern quadrant of USA had a connection to PRR apart from Boston. The Catskill division was completed in the first decade of the 20th century, while the tunnel-connection to Manhattan and Long Island was made, in a coordinated attempt to reach further northeast. In Schenectady yard facilities were shared with B&M, that also had interrest in the construction of the link to PRRs mainlines.

A part of this division - from East Branch by Delaware river to Arkville - was actually built by Delaware & Northern. There is also a branchline from Grand Gorge Jct to Oneonta, where it connects to D&H. This railroad too existed as Ulster & Delaware that streched from Kingston by Hudson river (NYC), passed Arkville and Grand Gorge and ended in Oneonta. It was incorporated into NYC in the 30's. In my freelanced world, D&N was purchased by PRR together with Ulster & Delaware's track Arkville - Grand Gorge - Oneonta (the other half of U&D ended up as NYC-track). The rest of Catskill division was built de novo by PRR.

Margaretville serves as a small classification yard for locals on the Oneonta branch and turns to Arkville where the chemical industry (fertilizer) and the NYC-interchange have the busiest spurs. In Margaretville there is a freight house, a team track and a spur to the agricultural co-op, that has a grain elevator and a warehouse that recieves food and produce and is sending cauliflower during the season.

There is also a branch to Pooncha (extending from the yard lead) where there is another grain elevator and a small factory for locks and safes.

The part I'll be building is Margaretville, Arkville and maybe Stamford on the Oneonta branch. The rest is represented by half-hidden staging (Schenectady and Wilkes-Barre), a fiddle-yard (Oneonta) or on-layout-staging (the NYC interchange and the Pooncha-branch). The layout is set in the late 1950's after the transition to diesels. Sidings and staging on mainline allows at least loco + 10 40'cars + cabin. The Oneonta branch maybe will allow slightly shorter trains. I will use Peco code 55. Medium turnouts on main and sidings, short ones in yards. Minimum curve radius is 12''.

The trackplan in full size is attached. I have the possibility to insert an 8' x 1' section between the staging and the fiddle yard, so it's possible to build Stamford on the Oneonta branch too. This part will be fairly straight forward I think, so I haven't put so much effort into the track arrangements here yet.

The trains i plan to run is something like:

  • 1 or 2 inbound freights from Schenectady and Wilkes-Barre, terminating in Margaretville in the morning and going back in the evening.
  • 1 turn Margaretville - Oneonta fiddle yard and back. This won't be able to handle all the traffic to the chemical plant in Arkville.
  • 1 turn Margaretville - Arkville and back.
  • 2 through freights - one in each direction - that might stop in M for urgent pickups/setouts. These might pass the layout several times if desired.
  • The Pooncha-turn is represented by the Margaretville-switcher bringing the cars on the yard lead in the morning and heading away last thing on the op-session.

A few things bother me:

  • The staging is on a 1,5  - 2 percent grade and the turnouts might end up in vertical curves which might be a problem (or what do you think?)
  • Should I include one more yard track?
  • It's a drawback that the trains pass the Arkville scene twice, but I can live with that.
  • The lack of passenger traffic. Maybe I'll include a pike-sized one running from south to Oneonta and back. Staging capacity is limited, though.
  • Is the whole thing believeable??? Would there be a classification yard in such a place and is it ok to include a freight house in this small town? I'm from Sweden with quite vague knowledge about North American railroading and geography, trying to pick up what I can from magazines etc. Please share your comments!!

 

 

 

 

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North Coast Electric Rwy. design & ideas-Chris

 Welcome to the North Coast Electric


 

 I just opened this page and will start adding content later today.  I could use some help with the design.  Here's a few teasers of what I'm us to.  Thanks. - Chris

 

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Sn3 - Durango, Rico & Northern - Jon Stetz

THE RAILROADS HISTORY

The Durango, Rico and Northern Railroad was conceived in the late 1800's as part of a network of rails and stagecoach lines designed to tie together the mountain ore towns between Durango and Rico and points North originally surveyed by Thomas Wigglesworth in 1881 for the Denver and Rio Grande, the route is generally believed to be the product of Otto Mears as part of the Rio Grande Southern. The line left Animas City, North Durango, ran severval miles up the Las Animas River Valley, then up the North fork of Hermosa Creek and down Scotch Creek just South of Rico. From there, it followed the Delores River, through the Lost Canyon and over Cimas Pass and then back to Durango. Although the Rio Grande Southern did build from Durango to Ridgeway via the Delores River route surveyed by Wigglesworth, the Rico to Rockwood branch was never built and remained a stage line and later a logging road.


The Denver and Rio Grande already had a existing line from Durango through Rockwood and on to Silverton. The Durango, Rico and Northern would have ran from Rockwood to Rico via Hermosa Park, then the East fork of Hermosa Creek, then down Scotch Creek, to Scotch Creek Junction with the Rio Grande Southern. It is this branch that is being recreated and modeled here on this web-site and in SN3 as it would have appeared in the years spanning 1940-1949 in Southwestern Colorado.


The DR&N, all it's references and descriptions are based on research material from the Rio Grande Southern construction as well as the Denver and Rio Grande during the 1890's and later years. During its construction, the DR&N had enough foresight to lay 50 pound rail, build heavier bridges and more adequate grading than was needed in 1891. This foresight paid off as the line was able to utilize its own C-16’s and the heavier K-27’s it leased from Denver and Rio Grande over the years.

For more progress/information on this layout, please visit durangoriconorthernrailroad.com.

Conventions

The LDSIG Annual Meeting and Convention is usually held at the same time and in coordination with the National Model Railroad Association annual convention. More information about the NMRA conventions can be found on their site.

There are also Regional, Divisional, and local LDSIG gatherings. If you are involved with planning such an event, please consider adding your event to our LDSIG Local Events section.

LDSIG National Conventions

This year's convention ...

All conventions, past, present, and future listed below:

Philadelphia Convention 2006

The 2006 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Philadelphia. More information on the NMRA Convention, Independence Junction 2006, is available by clicking here.

 

Layout Tours

On Wednesday, July 5th will be the layout tours and picnic. The layouts selected for the tours show many state of the art techniques, plus some adaptations of older designs to modern thinking.

Accessibility for the layouts are average. Most of the layouts are in basements, but most are newer homes with easy stairs. One has narrow steps, but it can be accessed from the house where there is a hand rail. One is in a garage with walk in access, and there are two that are unknown.

Bruce Friedman's CSX system is based on today's CSX, focusing on the Philly Subdivision. All trains are based on real life operating patterns, and the industries modeled are all based on actual locations along the line and include automobile manufacturing and distribution, plus many other industries. Many of the scenes, both on and off line are modeled after the actual locations. The railroad is double decked; with the bottom deck standard L girder, and the top deck 2" foam on metal shelf brackets. The layout includes two helixes, one that is 8' tall! There is a large staging yard, operational B&O signals using Integrated Signal Systems, and DCC by Digitrax. The railroad is 100% complete, with only minor scenery work to be done.

Carl Huth models the Reading in the era from 1952 - 1976. The main line from Pottsville to Philadelphia is double tracked, and the line to Newberry Jct. is single track. Reading PA. is the hub of the layout, and most trains will pass there and make large pick-ups and setouts. Freights will vary in length with some up to 80 cars long. There are 24 scheduled trains in an operating session and many extras. Operation is with waybills and Easy DCC by CVP Products. The main line and branch lines are point to point for operation, but continuous run is available for open houses. Two years went into the planning of the layout. It has 23 corners, multiple stairs a workshop, storage room, and a restroom! The bench work is open grid, with the roadbed laminated wood with spacers. Yards are plywood and homasote. Wide aisleways and no duckunders are the norm. A slide up section with 5 levels of track in front of the men's room door is the only duck under during operating sessions!

Paul Cappeloni models the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western in 1945-1953. The layout has a double tracked main line around the room, with the Bangor& Portland branch on a peninsula down the middle. The main line features continuous running. The layout is triple decked with staging on the lowest level. Many of the scenes are of a specific geographic location, and include the Delaware Water Gap and the concrete arch viaduct across the river. There is continuous staging around the room with many of the local railroads including the L&NE, the Lehigh Valley, the PRR, and the Northampton & Bath. The railroad is built with foam insulation board.

 

E. Winfield Gross' Pennsylvania theme railroad is a classic island style railroad with a number of new design ideas added in recent years. The old portion of the railroad is plain grid bench work with plaster scenery, while the new portions are shelves about 18" wide hung from the walls. The railroad features mostly PRR equipment, with Reading, Jersey Central, Lehigh Valley and Lackawanna interchanges included. The railroad is operated with car cards and hand written switch lists, and includes passenger and freight traffic. There are several branch lines and much local work to do. Control is by Digitrax DCC.

 

John Rogers models Northern New England railroading in the classic transition era. Included on this multi deck railroad are the Boston & Maine, Canadian Pacific, and the Maine Central. All traffic is controlled by timetable and train order. The railroad is a linear walk around design with a dual helix, and includes multiple main lines and branch line operations. There is a Dispatchers desk and telephone system in place for communications. All of the work on this current version of the railroad was completed in just over a year, and except for extending a branch line, all trackage and much scenery is in place. Control is by Digitrax DCC.

Larry Reynolds models the PRR from Huntingdon to Tunnel Hill. Operations feature passenger trains, symbol freights, and locals over a 4-track main line. Activities at Altoona and the operations through Horseshoe Curve are a focal point of the railroad. The railroad is a single deck linear design built around the walls of the room. Staging operations require an additional operator to control trains in and out of the active railroad. This operator supports the Dispatcher at Alto. There are a number of future projects in the works including an extension of he mainline west that will partially double deck the railroad, a signaling system, and a total redesign of Altoona yard.

 

Jim Hertzog's well known Reading Lines layout features the Anthracite coal region of eastern Pennsylvania during the steam to diesel transition era. Trains run under the control of the Dispatcher, and include passenger and through freights with numerous locals. Lenz DCC is used for control, and some units are equipped with sound. The layout is a linear walk around design that is single level and includes three helper districts. When facing the railroad West is always to the left. Staging is accomplished in a large double deck staging area. Bench work and track are complete, and most of the railroad is sceniced.

 

Joe Lofland's Erie -Lackawanna railroad focuses on the Lackawanna side of the lines from Stroudsburg to Binghamton. The railroad is around the wall with two islands, and is double deck at some points. Construction is L girders made from plywood, with risers and spline sub-roadbed. Homasote is used for the roadbed. The layout is constructed using cantilevers off of the wall studs with no posts or wires. When facing the railroad West is always to the left.

 

Jim Dalberg's prototype based layout is set in the transition era, and follows the Lehigh Valley and CNJ between Jersey City and Pittston. This double, and at points triple deck layout places towns in correct order and includes numerous interchanges with many other lines. The railroad is point to point and there are three staging yards and two helixes scattered throughout the railroad. Operation includes passenger and through freight, plus locals. Also included are car float operations to various NYC terminals.

 

Gale Smith's Lehigh Valley railroad occupies a 21' X 25' room with an around the room, double deck linear design. There is 365' of double track main line that runs from Allentown to Rockport Tunnel. There are staging yards at both ends (8 tracks East and 16 West end), with three major online yards. Traffic includes 5 local drills, two coal mines, and a cement industry, as is typical of the area served by the Lehigh Valley. Track work is almost complete and scenery is under way.

Paul Backenstose has recently completed the change of his PRR based layout to the Western Maryland. The original design was based on John Armstrong's PRR Schuylkill Division plan, to which three staging yards were added. The current operation reflects the WM from Hagerstown to Cumberland and Connellsville and the Thomas Subdivision. The railroad is built around the walls with a center peninsula, with portions multiple decked. Track work is almost completed, and many areas of the railroad are fully sceniced.

Steve Salotti models the New York, Susquehanna & Western railroad in 1949. The double deck, linear design occupies two large rooms in the basement. The railroad closely follows the operations of the Susie-Q in '49, with many actual industries and cars from the time period included on the railroad. Traffic includes commuter and express trains running on actual NYS&W symbols, with all freights run as extras. All passenger trains are first class and run on timetable, while freights run only by train order. There is a three to one fast clock, and phone system used to relay orders (Form 19). Track work is nearing completion, with only the Edgewater Branch with the large Ford assembly plant to be finished, and scenery is about 60% completed.

Ken McCorry is the host for our picnic this year, and his large layout, housed in its own separate building, will be open for you to visit. Ken's railroad models the ex PRR Buffalo line from Rockville tower near Harrisburg to the Ebenezer yard terminal in Buffalo NY. Current time period modeled is 1976-1983. RR requires 3 dispatchers Rockville, Kase and Lyco to handle operations on the 1450' long mainline. 20 operators are required for full operations. Signaling is currently in operation from Buffalo to Renovo. Scenery is about 65% Digitrax DCC.

In addition, Brian Good from our layout design challenge will have his basement space and collection of research materials open for you to look at. With a list of layouts like this, there are sure to be many ideas you can glean for use on your layout! Will we see you at the Junction this year?

Detroit Convention 2007

The 2007 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Detroit July 22-28.

Information on the NMRA Convention, The Great Lakes Express, is available by clicking here.

Information on the LDSIG activities at the convention is available here: http://www.nmra.org/2007/ldsig_page.htm#Great_Lakes_Express_2007
 

 

 

The following LDSIG activities are available to all convention attendees -- membership is not required (but we would love for you to join!)

Displays & LDSIG Desk – in the SIG Roundhouse (Mackinac East Room). Members’ informative displays include trackplan diagrams, layout photographs and 3d mock-ups, and priority lists of design features to help others learn how others have solved layout design problems. Design-related clinic schedules, descriptions of open-house layouts for the Wednesday tour, carpool signup lists, a local restaurant list, and a roommate-wanted list. A bulletin board will have important updates about LDSIG events -- be sure and check daily for activities and schedules. You may catch great discussions from time to time, especially in-between clinics. The SIG Roundhouse (Mackinac East Room) is open Sunday, July 22nd from 4:00p to 11:00p and daily throughout the week from 8:00a to 11:00p. Saturday, July 8th the SIG Roundhouse will close at noon.

Layout Design Advice – (Mackinac East Room) The Layout Design SIG offers a free design consultation service. Stop by for an available consultation period. Bring your list of "Givens & Druthers," proposed track plans, etc., to obtain valuable help.

(NEW) Pre-Convention Layout Visits

Sunday, July 22, 10:00a to 1:00p, Blissfield, Michigan (about 70 miles south of Detroit). Self-guided layout visits to Doug Tagsold's photogenic HO scale Denver, Front Range & Western and Doug's On3 D&RGW Silverton Branch (two layouts at one place); and the Blissfield Club's HO double-deck layout. Doug is at 303 S. Lane St., Blissfield. The Blissfield Club is at 115 E. Adrian St., Blissfield, Mi. Maps at the bottom of this page.

Sunday, July 22, Noon to 5:00p, Northwood (Toledo), Ohio. Pete Forbes will host an open house Sunday, July 22, for LDSIG and OPSIG members driving to the Detroit NMRA Convention via Toledo, Ohio. Pete is modeling about 4 miles of the urban PRR Phildelphia Terminal District between North Philadelphia and Frankford Junction. The 20x25' HO layout will feature the 4-track main line, signaled interlockings and catenary, industrial branch lines, and a fiddle yard to generate traffic. So far the main line is running and the N. Philly station platforms, Shore Interlocking, and several overpasses and underpasses have been modeled. From the Ohio Turnpike (I-80) west of Cleveland, take Exit 71 onto I-280 North. Go 7 miles and take the 3rd exit, Exit 6, for "Woodville/Curtis Road". Go up the exit hill and turn right at the stop sign onto Curtis Road. Go .2 miles and take the second right onto Chantilly Rue (West). The address is 108 Chantilly Rue (West). Pete's phone is 419-309-8648.

Meet 'n Greet – Sunday, 7:00p, Greco Room. Begin your convention by meeting other attendees who are especially interested in layout design. Hear informal LDSIG-member introductions about their layout design and construction status, plus timely event announcements and networking opportunities. Meet published authors and respected contributors to various email lists. A nice social occasion. Sunday, 7:00p, Greco Room.

The following LDSIG activities require membership in the LDSIG:

LDSIG Annual Meeting – Wednesday, 8:30a to 10:30a, Cartier Ballroom. Our annual membership meeting agenda includes bylaws amendments, voting for a director, and officer and volunteer reports. All members should participate because a quorum of members is required. Layout tour maps will be distributed at the close of the meeting.

LDSIG Layout Tour and Picnic – Wednesday 11:00a departure, last layouts open until 10:00p. A highly-regarded self-guided tour and picnic by carpool or rental car (no transportation provided). Tickets must be purchased at NMRA tour desk before Monday at 9:00p so we can finalize food order. Sign up for carpools Sunday-Tuesday in the Mackinac East Room. The time and location for finalizing carpools, organizing car rentals, and distributing maps will be announced on the LDSIG’s Bulletin Board in the Mackinac East Room. Information on nearby rental car agencies will be available for those wanting to gather a group of friends or "birds of a feather" to visit specific layouts. Event is open to members’ spouses. Nineteen innovative home and club layouts will be open to choose from – expect to see about ten, with up to 200 miles of driving. The picnic (ticket required) will be at the Operations Road Show layout location.

(NEW) Special Thursday Morning Layout Visits - Thursday, 10:00a to 1:00p, Blissfield, Michigan (about 70 miles south of Detroit). These layouts would have been on our Wednesday Tour and Picnic, but were in the wrong direction and too far away. Self-guided layout visits to three interesting layouts, including Doug Tagsold's photogenic HO scale Denver, Front Range & Western and Doug's On3 D&RGW Silverton Branch (two layouts at one place), and the Blissfield Club's HO double-deck layout. See below for addresses and maps. (These layouts are also open on Sunday before the convention--see above)

LDSIG Reception and Program – Friday, 6:00p to 8:00p, Penthouse of the Courtyard by Marriott Downtown hotel, two blocks from the main Convention hotel. Cash bar, light hors d'oeuvres (not a dinner). A great social occasion to wrap up the LDSIG’s week of Convention activities. An entertaining program will begin about 7:00p, featuring an illustrated presentation by Jack Ozanich, the designer of the very innovative and influential Atlantic Great Eastern Railroad. Spouses and members of the Operations SIG are welcome. Reception tickets must be purchased at the Convention Tour Desk by Tuesday afternoon (changed: was Monday, 9:00p). Plan on having your own early or late dinner (we will provide a list of area restaurants in varying price ranges), and join us for a "cocktail party and show" either before or after.

(NEW) Special Friday Evening Layout Visit - Friday, after LDSIG Reception, until 10:00p. Mike Burgett's fully signalled C&O layout will be open for modelers specifically interested in signal systems. If you missed this layout on our Wednesday tour, this is an opportunity for a visit. For directions, see maps from Wednesday or visit LDSIG display room.

All 20 Layouts on the LDSIG Tour and Picnic

Ann Arbor Model Railroad Club

HO Group 3

The Huron Valley Railroad is housed in an historic and restored 1886 Michigan Central Depot located in Dexter, Michigan.  It represents a shortline railroad being spun off the New York Central in southeastern Michigan.  Features include NCE command control and the JMRI computer application driving CMRI based detection and signals.  The layout is a single track point-to-point operation between Detroit and Jackson, with emphasis on local freight and passenger service.

Michael J. Burgett

HO Group 4

My HO scale railroad models the Chesapeake and Ohio’s (C&O) line as accurately as possible between Clifton Forge and Gladstone, Virginia in August of 1965. The historical aspect as well as the operational aspect is my main focus in the construction of this layout. Making the operator walk away with the feeling that he has spent a day back in time working for the C&O is the objective to this effort. The CTC system is of primary focus to me and will feature all aspects of prototype signaling as employed by the C&O, route locking, time locking, call on features and prototype C&O signal aspects to name a few. The CTC machine was acquired from an actual railroad and features only original Union Switch and Signal Company’s (US&S) components.

Larry Burk

HO Group 4

SE coal hauler/bridge line set in 1980. Large double and triple deck designed for operations. Staging for 45 trains. Numerous through freights, some locals and lots of coal. 25 – 30 car trains over a 600’ mainline. NCE radio DCC. Dispatcher control with radios. Monthly operating sessions with 15 – 20 operators.

Ken Chick

N Group 2

The Danforth Hadley & Northern is a 30' x 60' point to point railroad with two large yards and a large engine facility, featuring long runs through beautiful scenery between 12 cities on a 400' main line. Based on the Northern Pacific Montana Division operating between Huntley and Garrison, MT, it shares tracks with its parent NP and an occasional GN train. The railroad is steam to diesel transition on code 55 track with hand-laid turnouts and crossings, NCE DCC, a branch line and a separate logging railroad. Construction uses L-Girder benchwork and both Homasote on plywood and spline roadbed. Scenery uses “Oatmeal’ over Styrofoam and Geodesic scenery materials. An aluminum backdrop is used to round corners and for the backdrop on a peninsula. The DH&N has appeared in several major trade publications including most recently in Scale Rails.

Mario Mateo

HO Proto 87 Group 3

The CRRR is an independent line running from Anacortes, WA on Puget Sound and up the Skagit Valley to the Diablo dam construction site. The setting is just pre-WWII -- around spring of 1940 plus or minus one year -- at a time when many of the products of the Valley were in greatly increasing demand in the lead up to the war. The CRRR actively interchanges with the GN (at Burlington, WA) and the NP (at Sedro Woolley, WA), as well as with a number of small timber lines along its route. The CRRR layout is being built to Proto-87 standards; all layouts are custom built and all rolling stock must be modified significantly from typical NMRA standards to run on this track. As such, the CRRR is one of the largest P87 layouts in existence. The layout is designed for operation, with considerable staging available for the GN, NP , as well as the logging lines and numerous on-line and off-line industries for switching. The layout should be of particular interest to members of the Layout Design, Operations, and P87 SIGs.

John DePauw

HO Group 4

I model the Elgin Joliet and Eastern Railway in the fall of 1973. The actual prototype railroad runs a 30 mile radius around Chicago, Il. All railroads coming into Chicago cross the “J” at some point. Some railroads more than once. I have modeled most of these interchanges; some are at grade, others are over and under. There are 101 staging tracks. The layout is in a 2000 sq ft basement. The layout is built in a double deck configuration. In some locations there are 3 levels. I’ve used a support structure made out of metal in a “U” form. It is called strut. It goes together like an erector set. On top of the strut support system I have installed ¾” plywood with ¼” Upsom board on top of the plywood. I use cork for my roadbed for the mainline trackage and the industrial areas are laid directly on Upsom board. My trackage is all code100 flex track using Peco and Shinohara switches. I’ve used ¼” drywall for my backdrops and all corners are curved. I am using the NCE DCC system for control of the railroad. All main line switches will be powered and controlled via the dispatchers. I say dispatchers because there will be 2 dispatchers. The trackage between Gary yard and Joliet yard is double track and is controlled by the #2 dispatcher. The trackage between Joliet and Waukegan is single track with passing tracks and will be controlled by the #1 dispatcher. The layout has been built with operation as the basics.

Dan Kempf

Sn3 Group 3

The Clear Creek Branch is point to point with an option for continuous running. It is set in the 1930’s and starts at the wye in Forks Creek travels up the canyon of the Clear Creek to Idaho Springs. At Idaho Springs the line services passenger station, the Argo Mill and Stanley Mine, a mine supply warehouse, bulk oil, gasoline and coal facility, along with a lumber yard along and other general industrial sites. Moving up the canyon the next stop is Georgetown. In Georgetown the train will stop at the station or drop of loads of coal or lumber or pick up empty cars at Stewart & Wing. The Georgetown Power plant, mining supply warehouse or the Clear Creek Sampler Works are also serviced before heading off to Silver Plume. After crossing the Devils Gate Bridge the next stop is Silver Plume with its station, team track and coal, lumber and oil facilities. From Silver Plume it is possible to run continuous through the Alpine Tunnel to Forks Creek. The bench work is all “L” girder construction with riser and spline and homosote roadbed. The track and switches are mostly prefab. Some of the “special” track work in Idaho Springs is hand built. I have 3 PFM sound systems that operate the layout that add a great dimension to operation. The premises of operations are that three operators could operate at the same time. Two main line trains, while a third operates in a yard.

Bill Neale

HO Group 2

Actual railroad documents, ETT’s, track charts, historical letters, etc. were used to develop a plan. The plan was built in two stages, allowing early operation. A 3-dementional mock-up was created to check clearances, and to comprehend the overall look and feel of the layout. Some design for locomotive sound considered and incorporated. Part of the layout is actually double deck, with the mainline climbing a 2% grade to reach the second level. This replicates the eastbound helper district on the prototype, as the PRR climbed out of the Ohio River Valley from the Steubenville/Weirton Jct. area heading towards Pittsburgh. Design also accommodated both tunnels on this part of the line as important design elements in the overall plan. Total mainline length is about 3 scale miles. Staging was developed to provide a reasonable representation of the actual traffic running in September of 1939. Staging yards have minimal access, with 3 yards stacked on one wall, and partially hidden staging on the other side of the access aisle. Staging includes a loads in-empties out arrangement. Scenery in done through about 70% of the layout, with rough forms in place for the other 30%.

R. Brooks Stover

S Group 4

Prototypical representation of BC&G coal-hauling 19 mile line through WV mountains, including all four towns serviced by the prototype. Linear track plan with 100’ mainline on around the wall benchwork with large central peninsula with above-eye-level scenery. All three of road’s Consolidations and many of its rolling stock are modeled. Also represented is the Lilly Fork logging line of the ERC&L Co., including sawmill at Swandale. Layout is designed for prototypical operation, using car orders based on prototype paperwork. Typical op session runs 8 trains of all three roads. NCE DCC with Soundtraxx sound in all locomotives. Hand operated ground throws. All structures are scratch built from photos of prototypes. Some are accurate representations; others capture the character but are freelanced.

David Thornton

O Group 1

This is a railroad that represents a change in history. The Baltimore & Ohio acquired the Kanawaha & Michigan Railroad instead of the NYC. The line became a secondary mainline hauling coal from the Charleston, West Virginia area to the Lake Erie port of Sandusky, Ohio, where the B&O actually did have a coal dumper. The section of line I model is from Kanagua, Ohio, on the north bank of the Ohio River through Athens, Ohio to Zanesville, Ohio. There is interchange and trackage rights running with the C&O (Hocking Valley) between Galapolis and Hobson Junction, Ohio; a crossing and junction with the B&O St. Louis main at Athens, Ohio; and major coal mine branch at Botsko, Ohio; and interchange with the NYC (Zanesville & Western), NKP (W&LE), and PRR (Morrow Branch) at Zanesville, Ohio. There is a large, double ended division point yard at Kanagua. There is a three track, 72 car capacity stub end staging yard for Cincinnati, and 8 track, 192 car capacity double ended staging yard for Charleston and Newark, Ohio, and 2 – 2 track 24 car capacity stub end staging yards for the Pennsy Morrow branch, and one each 10 car capacity staging yards for the NYC and NKP. Traffic is predominately coal and chemicals moving north and manufactured goods moving south. There are two crossings at grade; one with the B&O St. Louis main at Athens and one with the PRR Morrow branch at Zanesville. The staging yards are located below Athens and the mine complex. Minimum radius is 60” and all curves are eased. #6 turnouts are the minimum with a number of #7 and #8 turnouts. All 65 plus turnouts are hand layed. There is currently over 800 lineal feet of track in place with a total of 1600 feet planned. There is minor passenger service (4 -5 car trains, all steam powered heavyweights) between Charleston and Cincinnati and Charleston and Willard, Ohio. This is late in the steam era, but the B&O is still heavily steam powered in this part of the world for another year.

Larry Wright

HO Group 2

Railroad is essentially the Ma & Pa moved from the east side of Pennsylvania to western Pennsylvania. It represents a shortline running from Wellsville, Ohio, on the Ohio River northeast to Erie, Pa.

Jim Zinser

HO/Hon3 Group 1

Michigan Upper Peninsula mining/logging theme. Rugged, UP scenery, detailed structures. Standard and narrow gauge trackage (standard gauge mainline and branch trackage completed, narrow gauge mainline trackage to be laid this summer but narrow gauge line will not be operational by convention time). A 10-track hidden staging yard that pulls out like a drawer when in use, then disappears under a town when not in use. Note that while the staging yard is complete and operational, the town over it will not be constructed until after the convention, thus the yard’s mechanisms will be fully visible. A whistle-stop station and water tank scenery section that flips over (via motor) to become just a section of wilderness. This “disappearing town” concept allows the same area to simultaneously serve both as a stop and a pass-through sceniced area, adding more “miles” to operating sessions. Thus even though a train will go through the same area more than once, the scene will change each time as will the action taken during operation. (Construction of this feature to take place this summer).

Operations Road Show

HO Group 3 (also the Picnic Location)

This modular constructed layout features TT & TO operations on 55 miles of the Wabash Montpelier Division’s Second District between Peru and Lafayette, Indiana. Designed with unobstructed access to fit into the typical hotel ballroom at NMRA National Conventions, a unique aspect of the modules is that they are double-sided; doubling the running length and with about one foot of depth to the modeled scene. The layout had its public debut in July 2003 at the Maple Leaf 2003 NMRA National Convention in Toronto. It also was displayed at the Cincinnati Convention. Intensive research for the layout included a detailed list of “Givens and Druthers” used to make design decisions. The layout was written up in the February 2006 issue of Rail Model Journal.

Skip McDonald

HO Group 3

The Mackinaw & Western models a fictitious bridge line in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula based on the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic in the 1950’s. The modeled portion of the line begins in Mackinaw City on Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, with the crossing of the Straits of St. Ignace modeled with the car ferry Chief Wawatamon a pivot arm crossing an aisle, and stretches to Ishpeming and Marquette in the UP.

Thomas Lendzion

O Group 1

The NYC Ypsilanti (MI) branch is a loose copy of an agricultural line which emphasizes switching, with 2 man crews assigned to locals. A yardmaster and a road crewman round out positions. I can accommodate approx. 6 people per session. The line models Southeast Michigan from Ypsilanti to Cement City, with 3 towns in between. All industry is modeled on the actual customers on the prototype.

South Oakland County Model Railroad Club

HO Group 1

We are modeling the Grand Trunk Western, Holly Subdivision from Milwaukee Junction (Downtown Detroit) to the city of Durand during the transition period. The layout is a two level design with two helixes and wide aisles. It is designed to be a point to point layout but has turnaround capability at each end. The upper level of the layout is single track representing the more rural areas with a few switching areas. Double track begins at the upper entrance to the main helix and represent the more industrial areas from Pontiac to Detroit. Our goal is to be as historically correct as feasible.

Dave Regittko

HO/HOn3 Group 4

Two division RR with division point yards, engine servicing and industrial switching. Four online towns, with much switching, staging for 16 trains at each end of the RR. Some HOn3. ABS signals, helper grade where trains won’t make the hill w/o helpers. Most switches are powered. CTC80 control. Need 12 operators for full session, can run with any number.

John Orminski

HO Group 4

Around the Walls with 3 Peninsulas, two level, two laps to complete. Large freight yard and engine terminal area. Diverse scenes, Dale Jct (WY) and German-themed towns. All Peco track and turnouts (approx 50) all powered.

Detroit Model Railroad Club

O/On3 Group 4

Easily one of the country’s oldest model railroad clubs, the Detroit Model Railroad Club was founded in 1935 and the Detroit Union Railroad has been located in its current home – a converted movie theater – since 1974. The railroad is 2 rail O scale and has 3500 lineal feet (32 scale miles) of hand laid standard gauge track with over 100 feet of On3 track under construction. The sloping floor of the old movie house allows the layout to be on two floors of the building with over 7 feet of elevation change and scenery topping 8 feet in some locations. And construction is not for the weak; access to some areas is by walking on the track! The 8 ½ mile long mainline is 50% double track and 50% single track with a ruling grade of 1 ½ % and there is a 2 ½ mile long branch with a ruling grade of 3% tying end to end with the narrow gauge line. Train control is by verbal train orders and radio controlled DCC. The railroad features 18 double ended staging tracks accommodating trains from 30 to 50 cars in length.

Roger Parry

HO Group 2

Roger Parry's large layout occupying his entire basement. Modeling the Great Northern in Washington, this single-level layout features five major towns each in a separate room. Specific scenes include a bay on Puget Sound, and the Cascade Mountains. Only steam locomotives are allowed on Roger's layout! Tall duck-under. Large staging yard; operations by waybill.

 

Directions for Sunday and Thursday Layouts

(see above for dates and times) Here are sketch maps to Doug Tagsold's layouts and to the Blissfield Club layout:

Anaheim Convention 2008

The 2008 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions was held in Anaheim July 13-19.

Information on NMRA Conventions is available at the national convention website - http://www.nmra.org/2008/; information on the LDSIG Convention is available here as well as on the NMRA site.



SIG Room

All week long you can make the SIG room the place to be. We are sharing the room with other Special Interest Groups including the Operations Special Interest Group which is planning a full round of operations during the convention. NMRA Special Interest Groups (SIGs) were invited at Anaheim Special 2008 to share modeling ideas, publications, services and membership information with convention attendees. The SIG Room (Grand Ballroom salon E with the contest room) is open Sunday, July 13th from 7:00 PM to 11:00 PM, Monday and Tuesday 8:00 AM to 10:00, Thursday and Friday from 8:00 AM to 10:00 PM. Saturday, July 19th the SIG Room will open and 8 AM and close at noon. Make the SIG Room your convention headquarters networking opportunities, meeting others for planning, designing, building, and operating considerations intended for your dream layout.

Displays & LDSIG Desk – in the SIG Room [Grand Ballroom salon E with the contest room]. Members’ informative displays include track plan diagrams, layout photographs and 3-D mock-ups, and priority lists of design features to help others learn how others have solved layout design problems. Frequently, the layout designer is available for discussion. Design-related clinic schedules, descriptions of open-house layouts for the Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday tours, carpool signup lists, a local restaurant list, and a roommate-wanted list will be available. A bulletin board will have important updates about LDSIG events -- be sure and check daily for activities and schedules. You may catch great discussions from time to time, especially in-between clinics.

Layout Design Advice – The Layout Design SIG offers a free design consultation service. Stop by for an available consultation period. Bring your list of "Givens & Druthers," proposed track plans, questions, etc., to obtain valuable help.

Meet 'n Greet

Meet 'n Greet – Sunday, July 13th, 7:00p, Begin your convention by meeting other attendees who are especially interested in layout design. Hear informal LDSIG-member introductions about their layout design and construction status, plus timely event announcements and networking opportunities. Meet published authors and respected contributors to various email lists. Sunday, 7:00p, in the SIG room.

Layout Design Clinic Track

Layout Design Clinic Track – Tuesday, July 15, A series of clinics will be presented focusing on layout design.

  Track One Track Two
Time Presentor Title Presentor Title
9:00 AM Byron Henderson Layout Design from the Prototype Cal Sexsmith Track and Scenery Design for a Prairie Town
10:30AM Seth Neumann RR communications Bob Clark Layout Design With A Passenger Train Orientation
1:00 PM Otis McGee John Armstrong's Shasta Route, part 1   Robert Reid Layout Designs For A Small Room
2:30 PM Otis McGee John Armstrong's Shasta Route, part 2   Bruce Morden   SP Santa Barbara Subdivision
4:00 PM Gurin, Fugate,
Henderson, Triggs  
Panel Discussion on Design Trends -
Featuring LDJ Editors
Paul Deis Designing A Garden Railroad, Survey to Construction  

The clinics will give real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout.

LDSIG Annual Meeting

LDSIG Annual Meeting – Wednesday, July 16th 8:30am to 10:30am in the Rancho Las Palmas Room [downstairs]. Our annual membership meeting agenda includes officer and volunteer reports. All LDSIG members at the convention are encouraged to participate. Layout tour maps will be distributed at the meeting.

Layout Tours and Picnics

This year the LDSIG has organized several self-guided tours. Two have meals and participants need Convention event tickets. Tickets must be purchased at NMRA tour desk before Monday at 9:00p so we can finalize food order. The tours are by carpool or rental car (no transportation provided). As private transportation, insurance is to be provided by the participants in the tour. Neither the LDSIG, Inc. nor the NMRA provide insurance coverage for private transportation. Sign up for carpools will be Sunday-Tuesday in the SIG Room. The time and location for finalizing carpools and organizing car rentals will be announced on the LDSIG’s Bulletin Board in the SIG Room. Maps will be distributed at the annual meeting, Wednesday morning. Information on nearby rental car agencies will be available for those wanting to gather a group of friends or “birds of a feather” to visit specific layouts. The LDSIG Layout Tours are open to members’ spouses, and Layout Tour tickets are required.

An interesting phenomenon occurs in Southern California along with other areas of the west. In residence buildings there are very few basements and because of the low pitched or flat roofs very few attics. That leaves spare bedrooms and garages as the most common space for the modeler’s railroad empire. Sometimes that space has to be shared with other uses – a bed, a desk and storage space in a bedroom or a car, tools and a laundry in a garage. Sometimes the former occupants never grace the space after the railroad is constructed – child off to college or car sits in the driveway. Occasionally, the modeler is lucky and is able to construct a purpose built space for their model railroad, but this is the exception and not the rule.

This year the LDSIG is offering two formal tours with 21 layouts of various sizes.

For the Wednesday tour the plan is to start at the Convention and see the layouts in Orange County in the morning and work our way north toward the San Gabriel Mountains then along the 210/134 towards the San Fernando Valley in the afternoon. The picnic will be held between 4 and 5 at Travel Town in Griffith Park. We will resume the tour with the Burbank, and Van Nuys layouts and then head to the South Bay for a few layouts there before heading back to the convention.

The Thursday tour to Santa Barbara is planned for the afternoon. Many of the same layouts will be on the convention bus tour Thursday morning. We want to allow the buses to complete their tours so that we can spend more time appreciating the layouts. Jon Cure’s layout is the initial layout tour stop and will allow you plenty of time to see both of his layouts. It will also allow you to stop for a quick lunch if you desire on the way up to Santa Barbara before the 1PM openings of the layouts there. Several of the Thursday layouts are open for operations Thursday evening. The meal for the Thursday tour will be at Gary Siegel’s amidst the G-gauge layout.

Most of the layouts fall in the garage or spare room category. There are a few unusual locations including one outside, one in a purpose built basement, two in a space dug out under the residence specifically for the model railroad and three clubs in larger spaces. Additionally, we have arranged for an informal tour on Saturday of three layouts in San Diego County. One is located in a basement or at least a lower story, one is in an office trailer and there is also a special behind the scenes tour of the La Mesa Club at the San Diego Model Railroad Museum. We hope you enjoy your visits to these model railroad empires and appreciate the use of the available space and the designs necessary to accommodate the railroad empires in those spaces.

Wednesday Layout Tour and Picnic

Wednesday LDSIG Layout Tour and Picnic (Convention Tour SGM1) – Wednesday, July 16th 10:30 AM departure, last layouts open until 10:00 PM. We have lined up about thirteen innovative home and club layouts which will be open for you to choose from. The picnic meal (ticket required) will be served at a location approximately halfway through the tour.

The following descriptions and photos will orient the visitors to the layouts on the tours.

Wednesday 10-2 HO Mike Kresen Connequenessing Line Scenery 90% 14x20 Easy Access Theme: Western Pennsylvania 1950’s

Mike Kresen’s HO scale Connequenessing Line, is a freelanced layout depicting an area in western Pennsylvania in the early 1950's. Mike began building the layout in 2003. The layout is approximately 14'X20' and is in a 2-car garage size. All Digitrax controlled including 31 Tortoise Machine switches controlled through stationary decoders. Mike is working on computer control including programming of locos via Decoder Pro software. The layout integrates 2 working yards, 1 turntable and a reverse loop via a double crossover. Motive power is a mix of steam and early diesel locomotives.

Wednesday 10-12 HO Jim Lancaster Los Angeles & San Diego Railroad Scenery 70% 40x15 Easy Access Theme: Southern California Citrus

Jim Lancaster’s HO scale Los Angeles and San Diego has been constructed in its own 40’ x 15’ building in back of Jim’s home , The model represents parts of Riverside and Orange County. The railroads represented on the layout include Santa Fe, Southern Pacific and Union Pacific. The benchwork is essentially complete (including an upper deck) but track and scenery on some sections of the layout are still not finished. The layout has several staging yards that enable numerous trains to enter the “working” portion of his layout. Jim has been doing some amazing research into the citrus packing houses of Southern and Central California [1] and has incorporated that research into his model empire. While the layout is still under construction, you can view the layout and some of Jim’s modeling skills at http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/modelrr.html

Wednesday 11-2 N Lestico, Mark UP Cascade Subdivision Scenery 70% 28X17 Easy Access Theme: Contemporary UP in Oregon

Mark Lestico’s N scale UP Cascade Subdivision is built in the typical Southern California garage. The N-Scale Cascade Subdivision is an operations focused re-creation of the beautiful Cascade crossing between Eugene and Klamath Falls, Oregon. The layout is set in the present time with Union Pacific in control of the line. The layout features a 13 track staging yard and 5.3 scale miles of mainline track. A 6 hour radio dispatched operating session duplicates all of the prototype traffic found on this line today. Innovations include using a sloping garage floor to your advantage, using narrow benchwork for a long run, Steel boltless shelving for benchwork, domino construction and many other contemporary design concepts. Over two years were spent on room preparation alone. Come and enjoy a clean, crisp and contemporary model railroading experience on the Cascade Subdivision in Whittier.

For a preview, see the website at: http://ldsig.org/wiki/index.php?title=Cascade_Subdivision_-_N_-_Mark_Lestico

Wednesday 10-1 HO Bill Meyer ATSF Western Region Big Creek Sub Scenery 85% 19x25 Duck under or stairs Theme: ATSF in Orange Co., CA

• Bill Meyer’s HO scale ATSF Western Region Big Creek Subdivision is a freelanced railroad based on the traffic and industries of Fullerton, CA and North Orange County set in the late pre-BSNF merger 1990’s era. The railroad scenery is about 85% complete and has 95’ of mainline with double ended staging supporting a total of 17 trains run in a 3-4 hour session. Traffic includes manifests from east/west ATSF traffic and 20+ local industries switched by the DB & AJ Railroad. In addition, there is interchange traffic with the SP and the DB & AJ Railroad. The dispatcher, yardmaster, road crews and SP local crew operate the railroad using CVP EasyDCC wireless throttles. Car forwarding is managed using car cards and waybills. Traffic control is managed via track warrant dispatching using radios.

Wednesday 11-2 HO Ralph Hougesen Amargosa Railroad Scenery 75% 14x17 Easy Access Theme: Bullfrog Mining District

Ralph Hougesen’s HO scale Amargosa Railroad is a freelanced railroad set in the post war through mid nineteen fifties era in the desert east of Death Valley between Beatty and Goldfield Nevada with connections and interchange with the SP, the UP and Santa Fe. Industries modeled are mining and support for the mining community with plenty of traffic to keep the railroad busy. The 14 X 17 HO layout is in an around the room dog bone configuration with combination of very reliable handlaid code 55 and Atlas code 100 track. Switches are operated using hand throws. The operational focus is local industry switching using car cards and waybills. Waybills are not turned. There is no dispatcher so crews handle clearance and meet negotiation. Control is DCC using Digitrax wired and wireless throttles. Most motive power has sound installed. The layout scenery is 75% complete. It is a beautiful little layout that runs very well.

Wednesday 1-4 HO Mike O’Brien Scenery 0% Basement stairs Theme: MKT Denison, TX

Mike O’Brien is still in the planning stages of his layout although some of the benchwork is already built. Come visit the LDSIG’s president and offer him some design advice in one of the few basements you will see in Southern California.

Wednesday 1-4 HOn3 and Sn3 Slim Gauge Guild Scenery 70% 40x40 Easy Access Theme: Colorado narrow gauge

The Slim Gauge Guild’s Sn3 and HOn3 Colorado layouts. Yes, there are two layouts at this location both modeling Colorado narrow gauge. The 2000 square foot basement contains an Hon3 DRGW and RGS based layout from the 1920 – 1949 time period. Specific prototype locations are modeled. The Sn3 layout is more freelanced. Scenery is nearing 90%. Both layouts were recently featured in Scale Rails and can be seen at http://www.slimgaugeguild.com/

Wednesday 1-4 HO Jim Spencer Denver and Rio Grande Western Scenery Easy Access Theme: Colorado Rockies

Jim Spencer’s HO scale Denver and Rio Grande Western models the Second Division standard gauge over Tennessee Pass and the Third Division narrow gauge over Marshall Pass with Salida as the junction between the two. The standard gauge models the run from Salida to Minturn on the other side of the pass. The future narrow gauge will model the run from Salida to Gunnison with branches to Baldwin and the Black Canyon.

The layout is entirely unscenicked. It was actually excavated under my house and was not originally designed to be there. However it is in finished space well suited for a layout. My house is on a hillside and the layout occupies the downslope. As such it is entered on level. But there is a duckunder of about 50" high required to enter the room.

It is a two deck design with the upper deck housing the standard gauge and dual gauge yards, mostly in place. The future lower deck will house the narrow gauge . Linking the two levels is a massive helix that transports the narrow gauge down about 24" to the lower deck. Atop the helix is the main dual gauge yard and turntable with roundhouse.

Construction of the upper deck is 2" foam-masonite composite panels that are cantilevered from the walls using ordinary threaded plumbing pipes and pipe flanges. This has minimized the thickness and eliminates interference with the lower deck. The roadbed is entirely on extruded foam and utilizes Woodland Scenics risers for elevation changes. Scenery will utilize the more common expanded bead foam.

The layout utlizes Digitrax DCC and has some locos equipped with sound.Tennessee and Marshall Pass is in a space under Jim’s home specifically prepared for the railroad. The lower level is Marshall Pass (narrow gauge) yet to be started. The upper level is Tennessee Pass (standard and dual gauge) which should at least have a full loop and most of the yards done by July. The construction is very interesting and unusual. It is mostly foam and cantilevered out of the wall. It uses Woodland Scenics risers and Jack Parker's Central Valley switch and tie system. It is DCC with SoundTrax.

Travel Town will be the site of our mid-tour meal. Started in 1952, this collection of prototype rolling stock includes 16 locomotives, 19 freight and passenger cars an several trolleys and motor cars. We will be picnicking at the museum. The tables just to the right of the large shed in the adjacent photo have been reserved for the LDSIG. There is ample of parking and plenty to see. For more information on the mueum go to the Travel Town web site: http://www.cityofla.org/RAP/grifmet/tt/index.htm

Wednesday 5-8 HO Paul Catapano Little Rock Subdivision of the Atlantic Inland Railway Scenery 40% 25x51 Stairs Theme: Appalachian coal & bridge route

Paul Catapano’s HO scale Little Rock Subdivision of the Atlantic Inland Railway is a freelanced eastern railroad set in July of 1952 in western West Virginia. The modeled portion of the road has a coal hauling base with industrial switching. Four coal branches coming out of staging drive coal traffic. A direct eastern interchange with the Western Maryland and a southern interchange via a secondary line to CRR, VGN, N&W, and INT provides a high level of interchange bridge traffic. Paul built the two story garage with the specific purpose of putting a railroad on the second floor. It is so large that he fondly calls it the “Garage Mahal.” The double deck 25' X 51' layout was built with a primary focus on operations. There is no helix but the second level is reached through a long grade requiring helper engines on all but the shortest trains. Stacked staging yards are beyond the modeled sections on both decks.

The layout is largely without scenery although Paul has put in some landforms and many structures or signs to designate specific industries. The operation uses TT/TO for traffic control and CC/WB for car forwarding. A Dispatcher is located downstairs, outside the layout room with a local Agent Operator in the layout room receiving and delivering train orders. Along with yardmaster, road crew and dedicated switching positions, there is a helper service crew for the grade between decks. Control is via wired and wireless CVP DCC throttles.

Wednesday 5-8 HO Dan Wexler Hamlin & Valley Central Railroad Scenery 95% 18x20 Easy Access Theme: California Citrus

Dan Wexler’s HO scale Hamlin & Valley Central Railway is a freelance industrial short line railroad with a citrus shipment focus set somewhere in California during the summer of 1964. The fully sceniced railroad measures 18 X 20 feet overall and is housed in a finished two car garage. While a talented staff maintains steam profitably for main line operations, yard jobs and the secondary mountainous Ore Grande Branch are serviced by Alco diesels acquired from operating partner ATSF. The railroad features a point to point configuration on two levels. Traffic control is via Time Table with switch list car forwarding by Rail-OPs. Digitrax DCC wired and wireless throttles are used for control. Web site at http://www.hamlintrains.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 6-8 HO Lee Christopher McCloud Railway Scenery 40% 19x17 Easy Access Theme: McCloud Railway

Lee Christopher’s HO scale McCloud Railway represents a circa 1997 short line handling lumber, paper and mining products. It’s modeled after the McCloud Railway and models specific areas on the prototype. This multi-level layout is 17’ x 19’ and operates point-to-point. Curves are minimum 28” with easements and turnouts are minimum #6, hand laid to fit the track plan. Rail is hand laid Codes 83, 70, 55 and 40. A signature element of the track plan is an actual representation of a long switchback used by the prototype. The railroad interchanges freight with the Union Pacific as part of the operations. More information at http://www.trainweb.org/mccloudrails/Miscellaneous/LeeChristopher.html

Wednesday 6-10 HO Los Angeles Model Railroad Society Great Lakes and Western Railroad Scenery 99% 40x50 Stairs Theme: Freelance

The Los Angeles Model Railroad Society’s HO scale Great Lakes & Western Railroad is a proto-freelance Railroad set in the steam-diesel transition era (1945-1960). The 2000 square foot GL&W has many interesting scenes along its route. Most all scenes and structures are based on actual prototypes. The railroad runs in an East- West direction from the Great Lakes to the west side of the Continental Divide parallel to other major name railroads and assists those railroads in relieving congestion during times of heavy traffic by issuing trackage rights to those railroads. The major railroads haul loads destined to locations on the GL&W as well as provide motive power and crews to switch the local industries. Traffic that results includes freight from several different roads working the GL&W as well as name passenger trains stopping at the local stations. The railroad features over 800 feet of mainline and two major yards. Trains running include local switching, interchange, unit trains and scheduled passenger service. Industries served include the largest HO scale oil refinery ever built , a modern intermodal transfer facility similar to Port of Long Beach, a grain terminal, an ore terminal including a scale model of Great Lakes ore ship Aurora, sugar beet loading, lumber operations, citrus operations with icing facilities, passenger trains from the golden era of passenger service and a large narrow gauge railroad. Yards include both diesel and steam service facilities. Operation positions include yard masters, local switching and road crews. The club is integrating computer control into its operations facilitating dispatcher assigned computer controlled routing although local routing control is also supported. Switch lists are used for yard switching while car cards and waybills (see http://tinyurl.com/ywyjja) are used for individual and block car movements. The club uses Digitrax DCC for train control and communications are via radio headset. Web site: www.lamrs.org

Wednesday 6- 9 N Frank Kenny Central Pacific Railway Scenery 50% 19x20 +10x12 Easy Access Theme: Tehachapi Freelance

Frank Kenny’s N scale Central Pacific Railway is a two-car garage and 1 bedroom layout. This railroad is set in California and reflects the areas from Mojave to Fresno, including the Tehachapi loop area. The era is the present. The premise is the SP was having financial troubles and needed money, so the CPRX (Central Pacific Railway ) management stepped up and bought the trackage between LA and Sacramento from the SP. The traffic is still BNSF/UP. There are also Amtrak and Metrolink trains as well as Central Pacific trains. The layout is built for operations. The mainline track was finished in August 2005. There are still a few sidings and spurs to be installed, including the industrial trackage of Fresno, and the remaining 9 tracks of the lower staging yard in the bedroom staging area. The layout is in a 19’ x 20’ room with the upper and lower staging yards in a 10’ x 12’ room, which also will contain the dispatcher’s desk. The main engine facility also will be located in this room. The layout is double-decked with the mountains on the upper level and the Valley on the lower level. Spline is used for the upper level roadbed. Control is Digitrax. Scenery is in progress (~50%) at this time.

Thursday Layout Tour and Picnic

Thursday LDSIG Layout Tour and Picnic (Convention Tour SGM2)

- Thursday, 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Santa Barbara, CA (about 130 miles north of Anaheim ~ 2.5 hours drive plus stops enroute). These layouts would have been on our Wednesday Tour and Picnic, but were too far away. This self-guided layout tour visits eight interesting layouts. There will be a picnic (ticket required) at Gary Siegel’s Thursday afternoon at 4:30 PM. Those who are operating layouts in the Santa Barbara area with the OpSIG are encouraged to join the LDSIG tour and join us for dinner.

The following descriptions and photos will orient the visitors to the layouts on the tours.

Thursday 8 - 12 HO Santa Susana Railroad Historical Society Santa Susana Pacific Scenery 90% 25x54 Easy Access Theme: So. California

Santa Susana Railroad Historical Society’s HO scale Santa Susana Pacific is located in the freight room of the historic Southern Pacific Santa Susana Depot, built in 1903 and recently renovated. The one thousand square foot layout utilizes Digitrax to control the trains, and the club in the midst of installing a DCC controlled signaling system. The existing track work, structures and scenery are being upagraded to "fine scale" modeling standards on the back 1/3 of the layout. The layout loosely represents Southern Pacific’s coast line in the mid 1950s, and the most featured display is of Simi Valley and its local industries. Also modeled are areas such as Camarillo, Felton, Cuesta, and Salinas.

Thursday 9:30- 2 HO Jon Cure SP Inyo Subdivision Scenery 70% 37x25 Easy Access Theme: Eastern California – Nevada

Jon Cure’s HO scale Southern Pacific Inyo Subdivision is located in Jon’s four car garage garage. The 37’ X 25’ layout models modern day traffic in California’s Mojave Desert and Owens Valley as well as an Eastern Sierra branch and some Nevada desert. Major industries include carbon black, copper smelting, tungsten and talc mining, cement, lumber and paper mills, and military installations as well as assorted industrial/commercial businesses such as lumber, fuel, scrap, etc. In addition there is an interchange with the Trona Railway. Typical trains are SP, WP, and ATSF. Trains are run from staging as extra’s and car forwarding is controlled by car cards and waybills. Jobs typically include yard masters, local switching crews, and manifest trains with scheduled work. The layout scenery is approximately 60% complete. Train control is NCE DCC with some sound equipped motive power. The garage is next to the UP/Metrolink (former SP) Coastline trackage so you might enjoy some real train traffic. As a bonus, Jon also has a T&NO Beaumont Industrial RR, an around the walls HO scale DC switching layout inside his house. Photos of the layout can be seen at www.pbase.com:80/rbarnes11/jcure

Thursday 1- 4 HO Gary Siegel L&N Eastern Kentucky Division Scenery 90% 25x60 Easy Access Theme: L&N Railroad 1971

Gary Siegel’s HO scale L&N Eastern Kentucky Division, is a well known operations oriented railroad in the Los Angeles region. The railroad was on the NMRA tour for the Long Beach national convention in 1996. It was featured in Model Railroader in April 1996. At the time of the article layout modeled the fictitious Ashlan subdivision of the L&N extending from Dent, KY, to Ashlan, VA interchanging with the Clinchfield. The layout has since expanded considerably and the area now models from Hazard, to Ashlan with interchanges with the Norfolk & Western through Norton, VA, the Kentucky Northern at Harlan Junction, KY and the Chesapeake and Ohio, at Deane, KY and Corbin, KY. More recently, the railroad was featured in Rail Model Journal in January and February 2008 and Model Railroad Craftsman in May 2008. The Eastern Kentucky Division models an area of coal mines in the Appalachians in eastern Kentucky and western Virginia. The year is 1971 so both 1st and 2nd generation diesels are the rule. Operations focus on coal traffic both on and off the line with mines and coal processing industries distributed in the mountainous Appalachian scenery. The EK is still running its own passenger trains. The 1500 sq ft HO scale layout is fully scenicked. Crews staff yards at Ashlan, Fowler, Dent, and Hazard. Road crews are responsible for mine runs, empty and full coal trains, hot freights, forwarders, local freights and an occasional passenger train. Communication to the dispatcher is via 5-channel radios. 3:1 fast clock moves the action along. Car cards and waybills are used to direct car forwarding. Control is DCC using CVP EasyDCC wireless and wired throttles. Web site: http://www.pbase.com/rbarnes11/lnekdiv

Thursday 1- 4 G Gary Siegel SP Santa Cruz Division Scenery 60% 200x185 Easy Access Theme: Santa Cruz to San Jose

Gary’s SP Santa Cruz Division layout is an operations oriented 1:32 standard gauge layout. Modeled after the Southern Pacific’s line from San Jose to Santa Cruz, the old South Pacific Coast R.R. The era is in the late 60's. the mainline is 750 feet long with five passing sidings. The railroad design is point to point. Mainline minimum radius is 8'6". The maximum mainline grade is 1.5%. We run with 1st. and 2nd. generation deisels. Mainline track and industrial spurs are in. The yard and industrial tracks at San Jose and Santa Cruz are not in yet. There are some temporary yard tracks in. Gary has planted several hundred dwarf Alberta spruce trees as part of the scenery. For more photos scroll down a few pages at the Gold Coast Garden Railway Society’s October 2007 newsletter http://www.gcgrs.com/October%202007%20on%20line%20edition.pdf

Thursday 1- 4 N Walter Naumann UP&W Scenery 20% 50x15 Stairs, ramp available Theme: Union Pacific Sherman Hill

Walter Naumann’s N-scale UP&W, is a representation of the Union Pacific June 20, 1949 with a no compromise scale mile representation of the “S” curve at Sherman Hill (scale 200 inch minimum radius) with hand laid #10 and #20 turnouts, super elevated code 40 track, and a goal of 100 cars trains. Less detailed operating extensions include yards at Cheyenne, Green River, and North Platt. Separate East and West nested-loop staging completes the layout. Car forwarding is by car blocks. Control is Lenz DCC using cordless phones for wireless throttles. It will have the m_RPS model Railroad Position System as shown at RPS-mrr.com. Operation positions include road crews, yardmasters, and dispatch. There will be 50 feet of double track main with one center siding, three 5 track main yards, and 8 staging tracks http://www.nacservicesinc.com/id7.html

Thursday 1- 4 HO James Donlon Southern Pacific Coast Line Scenery 60% 18x21 CRAWL UNDER Theme: SP Coastline ~ 1950

James Donlon’s HO scale Southern Pacific Coast Line, James Donlon’s HO scale, three deck representation of the Southern Pacific Coastline route. The circa 1950 era allows a mix of steam, first generation diesels and a few second generation diesels. The railroad seeks to faithfully recreate the SP’s Ventura Sub Division operations between Burbank Junction (roughly Glendale CA) and Sea Cliff (south Santa Barbara) with 350 feet of mainline in an around the 22’ x 19’ room. The railroad was built for operation. Using an original SP timetable from the era, James dispatches trains based on the actual time table of the day using and 8:1 fast clock to cover a 24 hour period in 3 hours with an average of 16-20 trains operating. The times of the trains on his model are within minutes of the actual 1952 SP timetable. Trains include through and local freights as well as named passenger consists. Trains run as scheduled and extra’s. Towns and landmarks along the route are captured in the layout including Santa Susana Pass, the yard at Oxnard and the “Y” for the Santa Paula branch line. The layout scenery is expected to be 30% complete. Car forwarding is handled via car cards and simplified waybills. Rolling stock and motive power are per the period and some power has sound. The layout configuration includes hidden staging at either end of the route and helixes to traverse decks. Operators include road crews, local switching jobs, and the Oxnard Yardmaster. MRC Prodigy DCC is used for train control. Entry to the layout requires navigating a “CRAWL under” so be prepared.

Thursday 1- 4 N Dana Driskel Los Angeles & Salt Lake Scenery 50% 18x21 Easy Access Theme: Salt Lake Route

Dana Driskel's N-scale Los Angeles and Salt Lake is in the back portion of his garage. This is Dana's third iteration of the route between Los Angeles and Salt Lake City, now a part of the Union Pacific. Dana takes his inspiration from the LA&SL's Third subdivision in the year 1920. The Third Sub was a helper district in southern Nevada. The railroad is itself a helix with grades around the walls. Nevada Desert and canyon landscape is the scenery theme.

Thursday 1- 4 HO Bruce Morden SP Santa Barbara Subdivision Scenery 0% 20x20 Easy Access Theme: SP Coastline

Bruce Morden’s HO scale Southern Pacific Santa Barbara Subdivision is another 2-car garage. The Southern Pacific Santa Barbara Subdivision models an area from Carpinteria to Goleta. Bruce’s layout is a work in progress and so far there is no scenery. Tracks have been completed on the first of three proposed levels. Two staging yards are completed and one medium sized on line yard. Construction includes “thin wall”, L-girder, and open grid. Roadbed includes solid masonite spline and plywood-homosote sandwiches. Bruce hopes to one day extend the tracks over Cuesta grade to San Miguel.

Saturday Self-guided Layout Tour

Saturday LDSIG Layout Tour

This tour will be very informal but we have several outstanding opportunities for layout visits on Saturday. Jay Styron's Southern Pacific Friant Branch and Steve Harris' Rio Grande Southern will be open and may be visited on trip to San Diego. We have arranged special "behind the scenes" tours of the La Mesa Model Railroad Club's Tehachapi layout at the San Diego Model Railroad Museum. If you are interested in participating in this special tour check in the SIG room.

Saturday 9-12 HO Jay Styron SP Friant Branch Scenery 70% 13x22 Easy Access Theme: SP Friant Branch (Fresno)

Jay Styron’s HO-scale SP Friant Branch layout (12' x 32') is housed in a fully finished room built under his house for the railroad. He has recreated the Southern Pacific's Friant Branch in the Fresno, California, area. The design of the layout includes careful consideration of aisle space, layout access, storage and lighting. Industries modeled include citrus farms, wineries, fruit packing houses and reefer icing facilities. Operations are DCC controlled.

Saturday 9-5 HOn3 Steve Harris Rio Grande Southern Scenery 70% 20x8 Easy Access Theme: Colorado narrow gauge

Steve Harris’ HOn3 Rio Grande Southern is housed in a commercial office trailer. Steve’s railroad was featured in Model Railroader in November 2004. More recently Model Railroader ran an article on one of Steve’s removable hills (Apr 2008). Steve has also had articles in the Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette on some of his structures and rolling stock. The helix has been replaced by one of Dick Robert’s train elevators.

Saturday 11-5 HO La Mesa Model RR Club Tehachapi Pass Scenery 80% 7500 sq ft on two levels Easy Access Theme: Tehachapi Pass

The La Mesa Model Railroad Club’s Tehachapi Pass layout is one of the largest model railroads in the world. For more than 24 years, the club has engaged in a demanding and expensive undertaking. Members have planned and built well over half the joint Southern Pacific/Santa Fe Railroad running from Bakersfield to Mojave, California, in the 1950s. The 70 actual miles was compressed to 25 scale miles. Two of the most dramatic things about the route are the mountain scenery and the nearly continuous series of sharp reverse curves forced upon the railroad by the rugged terrain. The current layout consists of the area from the Southern Pacific Bakersfield Yard through the famous Tehachapi Loop, where an engine of a 100 car train spirals up to cross directly over it’s caboose 70 feet below After 2 1/2 years of major construction to build the mezzanine and public viewing area, the club is now in high gear to finish the dream started over 20 years ago - building the best ever historical model railroad! Current projects include building switches, installing benchwork, adding details, buildings and scenery, adding to rolling stock and wiring the new railroad for DCC.

We have made some special arrangements to visit the La Mesa Club. Contact Bruce Morden in the SIG room at the convention to make arrangements for a special behind the scenes tour. The club’s layout is part of the San Diego Model Railroad Museum in Balboa Park near downtown San Diego. There is an admission charge of $6 for admittance to the museum. The museum includes 2 HO scale layouts, one O scale layout, one N scale layout and one O gauge toy train layout. It is well worth the $6 even without the behind the scenes tour.

Check for further details on these and other special tours in the SIG room.

Contact Coordinator

Bruce Morden is our LDSIG local convention coordinator for Anaheim, and he is actively looking for layouts to add to our tour. If you have interest in presenting a clinic, please contact Bruce Morden Please send any suggestions to him.

Anaheim is 27 miles southeast from downtown Los Angeles, about a 40 minute drive of so depending upon traffic.

Hartford Convention 2009

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Last Updated July 3, 2009

The 2009 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Hartford on July 5-11, 2009.

Information on the NMRA Convention is available at the official site http://hn2009.org/home.html

If you have questions or would like to get involved, please contact the LDSIG local convention coordinator, Jeff Zeleny.

 

 

 



NJ Layout Open Houses En Route to the Convention, Sunday, July 5th

Three clinicians will have their New Jersey layouts open on Sunday, July 5 for SIG members enroute to the Hartford Convention. The open house times have been staggered to allow approximately one hour at each owners home, and allow for travel time between Central New Jersey and Northern New Jersey
 

 

Ralph Heiss’ Lehigh Valley Harbor Terminal Ry.


Scale – HO

Layout Size – 11x30

Railroads Modeled/Era – Lehigh Valley Railroad and Central Railroad of New Jersey, circa 1951, focusing on the waterfront and industrial swtiching area of Jersey City New Jersey. Carfloats and large industry is the focus of the layout. Fiddle yard/open staging

Handicap Accessable? No

 

Dave Ramos' New York Harbor RR (www.nyhrr.com)

Scale – HO

Layout Size – 23 X 22

Railroads Modeled/Era – Erie, NYC & LVRR on the West Side of Manhattan in 1947

Handicap Accessable? No

 

Andy Rubbo’s PRR New York Division

Scale – HO

Layout Size – 26 x 37 (L-shaped)

Railroads Modeled/Era – PRR/1967 with emphasis on multi-track main line and catenary

Handicap Accessable? No

 

 

Craig Bisgeier’s Housatonic Railroad (www.housatonicrr.com)

Scale – HO Standard Gauge

Layout Size – Approx. 40' x 25', double-decked

Railroads Modeled/Era – Housatonic Railroad, 1892, with some New York & New England thrown in (After 1892 the Housatonic became the Berkshire Division of the New Haven Railroad)

 

Handicap Accessable? No

LDSIG Exhibit Room, Sunday, July 5 through Saturday, July 11

All week long you can make the SIG room the place to be. We are sharing the room with the Operations Special Interest Group which is planning a full round of operations during the convention.  Make the SIG Room your convention headquarters networking opportunities, meeting others for planning, designing, building, and operating considerations intended for your dream layout.

SIG Room Hours Open Close
Sunday 7 PM 10:30 PM
Monday - Tuesday 7:30 AM 10:30 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM 12:00 Noon
Thursday 7:30 AM 10:30 PM
Friday 7:30 AM 5:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM 12:00 Noon

 

Displays & LDSIG Desk – in the SIG Room. Check here in coming months for guidance on ways to improve your displays and instructions for shipping them to Hartford if you can't travel with them.  Members’ informative displays include track plan diagrams, layout photographs and 3-D mock-ups, and priority lists of design features to help others learn how others have solved layout design problems. Frequently, the layout designer is available for discussion. Design-related clinic schedules, descriptions of open-house layouts for the Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday tours, carpool signup lists, a local restaurant list, and a roommate-wanted list will be available. A bulletin board will have important updates about LDSIG events -- be sure and check daily for activities and schedules. You may catch great discussions from time to time, especially in-between clinics.

Layout Design "Help Desk" –  LDSIG volunteers will be available at several times during the week to provide free sit-down guidance if you are in the process of designing your layout.  To get the most value from these opportunities, do some homework before asking for help: prepare a dimensioned drawing of your layout space, identify your "Givens", "Druthers", and constraints, and bring a map or route schematic of your proposed territory.  Also bring forecasts of the traffic mix and jobs you'd like to feature during your eventual operating sessions

Operations SIG Presence - The Operations SIG is bringing the Rails on Wheels (ROW) group http://railsonwheels.com/ from Michigan. Their fantastic modular Operations Road Show Timetable and Train Order (TT&TO) training layout will be available in the SIG room.  

Meet 'n Greet, Sunday

Begin your convention by meeting other attendees who are especially interested in layout design. Hear informal LDSIG-member introductions about their layout design and construction status, plus timely event announcements and networking opportunities. Meet published authors and respected contributors to various email lists. Sunday, 7:00p, in the SIG room.

Special Albany Area Layout Tours, Monday

Albany Area Layout Tours – The LDSIG is sponsoring its first daylong tour of layouts to Albany New York, 2+ hours from Hartford. Hosts include Dick Elwell's HoosacValley, Henry Probst's NYCentral between Albany and Utica, Tony and Diane Steele's D&H, and several others. This tour's price will be $18, and does not include a meal.  Participation is limited to LDSIG and OPSIG members and their families/significant others.  Some of the tour layouts will also be hosting operating sessions in the evening, so carpools must be closely coordinated.  We will be making arrangements to form carpools before the Convention, on Sunday July 5 and early Monday, July 6, so check this website for updates.  Also check the OPSIG website for information about its conflicting, non-Albany Monday operating sessions.

Owner

Scale

Railroad Name

size

Scenery

Control

Era

Area Modeled

Henry Probst

“HO”

New York Central Mohawk Div

55x30

90%

Dynatrol

1950’s

New York State

Mike Ledley

“G”

A&LM Railroad

80x80

100%

Aristo

1950-60’s

Ohio/New York

Andy Clemont

“HO”

Rutlands Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain

23x39

50%

Digitrax

1940-50’s

Ohio/New York

 

Vic Roman

“HO”

NYC Hudson Division

25x25

50%

DCC

1948

New York State

Bill McChesney

“HO”

Lehigh Valley

13x30

75%

DC

1966-67

Pennsylvania

Dick Elwell

"HO"

Hoosac Valley Railroad

 

 

 

1950’s 

New England 

 

Tony & Diane Steele

"HO"

Rutland & Albany Railroad

25x35

50%

DCC

1980's

New York State

Ken Nelson

"HO"

Poco Valley Railroad

 15x25

100%

NCE 

50's - 60's

NY, PA, & Mass

 

 Here are descriptions of the layouts on the Monday tour:

  Henry Probst with Paul Allard Selkirk on upper left and Fonda on the right.

 Henry Probst's layout centers on the New York Central mainline operations in the early 1950's from New York City to Albany/Selkirk area in the east through the Mohawk River Valley to Utica in the west.  It is a multi-decked layout with Rail-marine terminals New York City) and dense passenger and freight operations. Layout Design features include: track plans (yards, industries, mains) that follow the prototype, left hand running from Hoffman's to Selkirk (per the prototype), Schedule Symbols and car routing that follow NYC practice.  

Mike Ledly's A&LM Railroad is a a large outdoor layout featuring 100's of miniature plants and bushes to complement a large and winding layout.  There are two yards, two reverse loops, and great views of operating trains.  The layout features a roundhouse and turntable, two towns, and several bridges.  The layout was featured in Model Railroader in August 2006. 

 

Name: Rutland Railroad’s Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain Subdivision

Size: 23' x 39'

Prototype: Rutland Railroad

Era: Fall -late 40's early 50's

Style: Linear walk around

Mainline Run: Completed 130' Additional Planned 120'

Minimum radius: 30"

Minimum turnout: #6

Height: 53" to 64"

Track: Code 70-flex track

Control: Digitrax Empire Builder radio/infrared

Scenery: 70% of finished layout

 

 

 

 

                                                                   

 Andy Clemont's Rutland Railroad's Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain Subdivision is modeled in the period from 1948 to 1953 in the fall around October 15th.  This section of railroad parallels the Canadian border from Albught, VT to Ogdensburg, NY.  There is interchange with the D&H, CN, Central Vermont, and NYC.  Terrain along the right of way is fairly flat with low hills and ravines with rivers and bridges.  It is a rural setting with villages.   Engines have sound.  About 70% of the scenery is complete on the completed portions of layout.  A second pennisula and second deck are planned. Vic Roman's New York Central Hudson Division models the area from Albany, sout to Tivoli, NY, with an expansion in the works to Poughkeepsie and Croton Harmon.  Densely populated cityscape, unique weathering and distressing on structures.  A masterpiece in progress.  See videos of the railroad in action at http://www.youtube.com/user/aclermont59

 

Bill McChesney's Lehigh Valley Railroad features the mainline symbol freights of the Lehigh Valley, The Jersey Central, Reading, Lehigh and Hudson and the Delaware and Hudson connection from Binghamton to Sayre. There are four yards, two industrial areas, a brewery and a float operation. A total of 26 trains are run between two separate, 3 hour operating sessions. The layout was featured in the March 1998 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman. There have been a number of photos of the layout in the Walthers' catalogs. 

Dick Elwell's Hoosac Valley Railroad is has been rebuilt in 2005 in it's new home.  The HO scale railroad captures the essence and feel of railroading in New England.  Perhaps one of the finest layouts in the country and featured in numerous articles over the years.  Several books and DVD's have been made both about the construction and content of this layout.

Tony & Diane Steele's Rutland & Albany Railroad is currently under construction from a previous layout this large project will contain 7 levels, 3 helix's plus a train elevator(RoRo).  The 25' X 35' HO scale layout is about 50% sceniced.

     Ken Nelson's Poco Valley Railroad is the home of a freelanced Northeastern RR, hauling freight and passengers in the 1950's and 60's. It serves Mass, PA, and NY.  It runs from Boston, MA (staging) westbound through New York and Pennsylvania, serving Nelson City (main terminal), Mt Crumroy, Klingertown, Scottsdale, Hillside Jct., and Jefferson Jct. (staging).  At Jefferson Jct., the railroad interchanges with the New York Central.  In Klingertown, the PV crosses and interchages with the Delaware and Hudson, which is represented by staging tracks.  At Hillside Jct., a branch line leaves the main and runs through Rockville and Hillside.  In Hillside, the railroad interchanges with the Hillside Street Railway, which serves the Hillside Industrial Park and the town of Coopersburg.  The Hillside Street Railway used to be a trolley line many years ago.  After going out of business, the tracks were bought by the PV, and now runs with a diesel.  

The town of Scottsdale features a cement plant which was published in the July 1994 Model Railroader magazine.  The town of Rockvill on the Hillside branch is didicated to a large coal mine.  The town of Hillside is designed after the track plan of New Hope, PA where I worked on the New Hope and Ivyland RR.   The railroad, minus the Hillside Street Railway segment, was published in the January 1991 issue of Model Railroader, and the Hillside Street Railway was published in the February 2000 issue of the NMRA Bulletin.   There are numerous kit built and scratch built structures and the layout features both a mainline and branch line with working signal systems. 

In addition the RR switches industries with the Hillside Street Railway in a different room on the other side of the basement.

Layout Design Clinic Track, Tuesday

Layout Design Clinic Track – On Tuesday, July 6, HN2009 and the LDSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on layout design. The clinics will provide real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout. All these clinics are open to all convention attendees.

 

Of special note is the 7PM New England Forest Modeling clinic by John O'Keefe, Museum Coordinator of the Fisher Museum Harvard Forest.  The Museums dioramas [
http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/museum/dioramas.html ] are exquisite scale scenes depicting the land-use history, ecology, and conservation of New England forests.  This
clinic is not to be missed.

 

  Track One Track Two
Time Presenter Title Presenter Title
8:00 AM Tony Koester Introduction to Layout Design Elements  
9:30AM Gerry Albers Designing the Deepwater District with CAD John Pryke Modeling the Urban Setting
11:00 AM Chris Bond Ergonomic Considerations for Sit-down Operators Bill Schaumburg Commuting on the (model) Railroad
Lunch
1:00 PM Dick Foley Modeling the Reading in Philadelphia: Industrial Waterfront circa 1953 Gerry Fitzgerald   

Extra South, War Time Ops on the C&O Olby Branch, 1944

NOTE: This clinic will not be available Tuesday but will be given Saturday morning.  Please check the schedule in the SIG room.

2:30 PM Phil Monat Design, Construction and Modification of the Delaware & Susquehanna Jim Schweitzer Hands on TT&TO 101
4:00 PM   Ted Culotta  Designing my New Haven Railroad to Highlight Rolling Stock Mike Tylick Layout Design ideas from the Boston and Albany
Dinner
7:00 PM Jonathan Jones Principles of Urban Design John O’Keefe New England Forest Modeling
8:30 PM Andy Rubbo Modeling PRR’s NJ Main Line under Catenary Marty McGuirk Interloper from the North: Modeling the Central Vermont in Southern New England
10:00 PM Greg Johnson Designing Industrial Strength RR Allegheny Teminal: Serving Pittsburgh's Heavy Industries Doug Gurin

Layout Design Lessons from Paul Dolkos' B&M New Hampshire Division Layout

[See a photo of Paul's layout immediately below.]

 

LDSIG Annual Business Meeting, Wednesday, July 8, 8:30AM

LDSIG Annual Meeting – Our annual membership meeting agenda includes officer and volunteer reports. All LDSIG members at the convention are encouraged to participate.

Hartford Region Layout Tour, Wednesday

The LDSIG business meeting will be followed by the traditional Wednesday LD SIG self-guided tour. This event will be extra fare and limited to LDSIG/OpSIG members and families/significant others. There will be no picnic this year. You should plan to eat when and where your carpool feels the need. The price of the tour is $24,  so you should have plenty of spare change to get whatever food you like.

 

 

Owner

Scale

Railroad Name

size

Scenery

Control

Era

Area Modeled

Bob Davis

“HO”

Mashamou Valley & Western

15 x 40

95%

DCC

!950-70’s

Freelance

Bill Duffe

“HO”

LKJ&W Boston & Maine Div

18 x 42

85%

NCE

1950’s

New England

John Ellwood

"HO" 

Olympic and Puget Sound Ry

 

 

 

 

Washington State

Bert Sacco

"HO"&"O"

Allegheny Union Railroad

15 x 21

100%

DC

1950's

Allegheny Mtn's

 

John Grosner

“HO

NHRR - Naugatuck Div.

20 x 16

100%

DCC

1950

Connecticut

Bob Collett

"HO"

HuntingtonHartford  &

20 x 30

100%

DCC

1950's

Connecticut

  

John Sacerdote

"HO"

The Berlin, Bangor & Maine RR

30 x 25

85%

DCC

1950's

MaineNew Hampshire /

  

Bill Schneider

"HO"

New YorkOntario, & Western

10 x 15

 

DCC

1950's

Eastern US

  

Earl Smallshaw

"HO"  &

"HOn3"

Middletown & Mystic Mines Railroad

13 x 20

95%

 

1925

Connecticut

  

Paul Mangini

"HO" & "HOn3"

Clintonville & ForestCity Railroad

 

 

DC

Early 1900

Connecticut

  

Brian Whiton

"HO"

AddisonRutland Railroad Branch

20 x 30

95%

DCC

 

Vermont

Bob Van Cleef

"HO"

North River Railway

12x30

95%

DC-DCC

1920's

New England

  

Donald Irace

"HO"

ProvidenceWorcester Railroad &

42 x 25

  80%

DCC

Modern

New England

 

Here are some descriptions of the layouts that will be featured on the Wednesday Tour:

Bob Davis'Mashamou Valley & Western is a two level layout with a helix.  Aproximately 2500 feet of track with over 140 turnouts and a double track main.  58 industrial sidings make this layout a switchman's dream. The layout consists of three railroads - The MV&W, the Providence and Worcester and the New Haven.  Each railroad picks up and sets out in specific locations.  The main yard is in Applegate where all trains are assembled and taken down.  There are two yardmen assigned to Applegate.  The west end yard man assembles trains and sets them out on the outbound tracks.  He then hands the switch list over to the east end yard man who places power and cabooses on these trains.  The west end yard man also is responsible for taking classifying inbound trains and putting motive power and cabooses away.  The MV&W is in charge of all interchange trains between yards and the ferry operation at Alexander Bay.  The car ferry at Alexander Bay brings cars to and from P.E. Island.  The island is famous for its potato crop, thus all the empty reefers going to the island.  Its power plant is coal fired requiring a large amount of coal.  There is also a milk train pulled by a Budd car that picks up 40 quart milk cans and passengers.

 Bill Duffe's Boston and Main Division follows the Fichburg Division from East Deerfield to Mechanicsville with the branch to Troy (and to New York City staging).  The Rutland Division (newly added) represents North Bennington northward to Rutland (staging).  Using model railroader's "license" there is a Great Lakes style carferry operation at Mechanicville.  A dispatcher's board for the B&M Division and in-house telephone system facilitate operations.    

                                                                               

                 

John Elwood's Olympic and Puget Sound Railway is set in the Pacific Northwest.  His highly detailed layout was featured in the March 2007 Model Railroader. Since the article the Puyalup River waterfront and Tacoma are complete along with the addition of about 30 structures. Most are scratchbuilt with a few craftsman kits thrown in.  The layout is operationally simple, using switchlists developed before each session.  Due to the small size of the layout, we use two crews with two in each crew.  DC control is still used. Visitors, however, will get an eyeful. There are currently over 100 structures in place and sceniced. Many of them are scratchbuilt from photos. The photo was taken by Phil Monat and appears as the opening shot on the convention Promo Video www.hn2009.org/promo_video.html. There is another shot around my sawmill in the same video.

  

 

 Bert Sacco's Allegheny Union Railroad is a Class I pike with long mainline running in rugged mountain country. A long 2% grade extending through two sets of reverse curves makes operations interesting as the main line rises from 42" to 66" above the floor. The 1950's era allows running of both heavy steam and early diesel locomotives. Most of the structures are commercial kits that have been kit bashed to fit specific area's. Two thirds of the bridges are scratch built. This layout has been featured in 1994 MR. Other features of Bert's layout include:

  • Scenery using hard shell and wet cast rock molds
  • Stock turnouts curved to fit layout conditions
  • DC and DCC optional power
  • "O" scale traction coffee table layout

 

 

Layout map published with permision of Model Railroader magazine.

John Grosner's New Haven RR - Naugatuck Division is an amazingly detailed replication of Derby, CT and the NHRR is not to be missed. Numerous scratch built structures to match the prototype, attention to detail, working signaling system and hand-laid track make this layout very impressive. Unique design of the layout room and creation of back drops round out this layout. John's layout was featured in the April 2009 Model Railroader.

 

Bob Collett's Huntington & Hartford is a freelanced CT shortline that parallels the Naugatuck and Higland lines of the New Haven RR.  Numerous scratch built and craftsman structures.  Fine attention to detail. The existing logging line was extended from 15 to 45 feet and up steep grades to a height of about 80 inches.  The layout was featured in the December 1996 MR.

 

 

John Sacerdote's Berlin, Bangor & Maine Railroad is a view the Maine and New Hampshire area as seen by the Bangor and Aroostock and Maine Central RR's. All track on this layout is hand aid code 83 and code 70 rail with over 100 turnouts.

Bill Schneider's New York, Ontario & Western is a 10' X 15' HO layout built as an exercise in fitting as much layout as possible into a minimal area.  It features double deck construction with third deck for staging, prototype based track plan, and hand laid Code 70 & 55 rail on all visible track.  Layout is fully scenicked with many scratch built structures.  The layout is fully operational with DCC control.  The roster includes mostly sound equipped locomotives and detailed rolling stock.  The layout has been featured in a few magazines over the years, either in whole or as part of cooperative photo articles with my friend and fellow O&W nut, Mal Houck.  These include Railroad Model Craftsman March 2004 and May 2005, Great Model Railroads 2006, Prototype Railroad Modeling Vol 1(Speedwitch Media), and most recently Tony Koester's Multi-deck layout book from Kalmbach and in parts on Railroad Model Craftsman's current on-line Boomer Trail http://www.rrmodelcraftsman.com/boomer_trail.html . Visit the New York, Ontario & Western web site at www.comcast.net/~oandw/ 
 
Earl Smallshaw's Middletown & Mystic Mines Railroad is very well known to both modelers in CT and around the world. The layout features floor to ceiling scenery, and urban scenes, most notably Middletown.
Layout map published with permision of Model Railroader magazine.
It is primarily a coal hauling line. There is much attention to detail on this layout, including the ability to  go from daylight to night time with illuminated structures. Over 40 articles have been written about this layout and it has been featured in numerous model RR publications over the years. A layout not to be missed while here in CT.

Paul Mangini's Clintonville & Forest City Railroad is based on a New England small city with trolley line, a saw mill, full round house and a narrow guage sub that serves  the small village of Gildersleeve. Layout features a large number of scratch built structures with fine attention to details. Also fetured is a brown stone quarry aand numerous bridges and trestles. For some photos of Paul's layout go to http://smallshawrailroad.com/htfdworkshop-2.htm and then scroll down to Paul's section.

Brian Whiton's Addison Branch of the Rutland Railroad is an operations styled layout featuring a staging yard with 47 tracks. 

It conveys a New England feel with over 100  industries and a varied operational design.

 

 

Bob Van Cleef's North River Railway is a 12' X 31' 1920's HO scale layout.  If you're excited about computer control and electronics this will be the layout to see. Besides the handlaid track,7 main switching area's and over 50 industries, Bob has develop his own computer controlled form of DCC. The layout is controlled via the computer using software developed by Bob.  Kitbashed and scratch built structures round out the layout. You can see more photos on line at http://www.northriverrailway.net

 

 

Donald Irace's Providence & Worcester Railroad is a double deck layout that covers the modern operations of the P&W in NY, CT and RI. Interchange with current NE providers. Numerous industries and interchanges. Unique CTC and dispatching setup. Layout is dispatched from RINGGOLD, GA !  There is web site at www.trainweb.org/pwmrr that includes a track plan and more photos.  Don's Layout was featured in the May 2009 Railroad Model Craftsman.

 

Layout Design Forums, Thursday

Layout Design Forums –  On Thursday HN2009 and the LDSIG will be presenting an all day series of forums focusing on layout design.  If you might like to participate as a panelist or have discussion topics to propose, please contact Doug Gurin, dgurin@comcast.net or call 703-549-0925.  Also consider bringing layout photos or other materials relating to the panel discussion topics to exhibit in the LDSIG room. 

Time Title
8:00 AM Active Staging with Fiddlers and Moles
9:30AM Designing for Passenger Operations and Jobs
11:00 PM Mechanics of Modeling Rail Marine Operations - joint with the Rail Marinie SIG
Lunch
1:00 PM Layout Design to Facilitate Signaling
2:30 PM Modeling High Density and Electrified Railroads in the North East
4:00 PM Turnout Considerations for Layout Design and Ops
Dinner
7:00PM Modeling New England Settings in 5 Seasons
8:30 PM Modeling Big City Settings
10:00 PM Modeling Right-of-Way and Track Alignment

.

LDSIG Banquet, Friday

LDSIG Banquet – The LDSIG will once again host its traditional reception and high-quality banquet for LDSIG members and their families/significant others. Come join your friends for an evening of food, friendship and fun.  This years LDSIG banquet will be held at Carbones Restaurant in Hartford, CT on Friday.   

The featured speaker will be Richard Abramson, long time professional railroad engineer and talented modeler.  Richard's talk on "Modeling a Prototype through Selective Compression promises to be both informative and entertaining. Among Richard's credentials are:

Model Railroader for over 50 years
Former employee - New Haven / Penn Central / Amtrak / NY Cross Harbor
Currently - Engineer - Housatonic RR
Member of the Board - New Haven Historical Society
Chair - New Haven Technical committee
Featured in MR in August 2004
 
LDSIG and OpSIG members and their families are invited.  Seating is limited. Carpooling will be facilitated, since the restaurant will be near the Convention.  The price for this event will be $80 per person.  Tickets may be purchased through the convention office through Tuesday evening only.

Layout Design Clinic Track, Saturday

Over the years, many LDSIG members seem to finish their participation in the NMRA Train Show on Friday.  To add more value to the Convention Week, the LDSIG has arranged for several additional clinics on Saturday, including a session for audience feedback about a limited-circulation professional video documenting lessons from one of the hobby's most popular layouts, which was sold and moved in 2008.

Time Title
9:30AM Gerry Fitzgerald: Extra South, War Time Ops on the C&O Olby Branch, 1944
11:00 PM  
Lunch
1:00 PM  
2:30 PM  

 

 

 

Milwaukee Convention 2010

Last Updated June 22, 2010

The 2010 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on July 10-18, 2010, to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the founding of the NMRA.

Information on the NMRA Convention is available at the official site http://www.nmra75.org/

If you have questions or would like to get involved before or during the convention, please contact the LDSIG local events coordinator,  Seth Neumann via email at sneumann at pacbell dot net or click anywhere in this paragraph.

Note: Watch this site for updates on clinics, forums, layout tour information and other convention activities.

 

Sunday, LDSIG Drive In Tours

Mike Ritschdorff will have his layout open on Sunday.  There is information about his layout in the Wednesday Tour Section below.  Ted Schenpf  will be holding an eleven day open house from Friday July 9 to Monday July 19th.  Each day from 9 AM  to  5  PM, you are
welcome to visit.  Ted will be operating 1  PM  to  5  PM, on the following dates:
Saturday - July 10
Sunday - July 11
Saturday- July 17
During the none operating times, staging the layout will be taking place and your are welcome to help.  No
reservation is necessary for the open house. Ted will also be on the Wednesday Tour and there is information below about his layout. Contact Seth Neumann for further information (click here)

  LDSIG Exhibit Room, Sunday, July 11 through Saturday, July 17

All week long you can make the SIG room the place to be. We are sharing the room with the Operations Special Interest Group which is planning a full round of operations during the convention.  Make the SIG Room your convention headquarters networking opportunities, meeting others for planning, designing, building, and operating considerations intended for your dream layout.

SIG Room Hours

Open

Close

Sunday

7 PM

10:30 PM

Monday - Tuesday

7:30 AM

10:30 PM

Wednesday

7:30 AM

12:00 Noon

Thursday

7:30 AM

10:30 PM

Friday

7:30 AM

5:00 PM

Saturday

8:00 AM

12:00 Noon

 Displays & LDSIG Desk – in the SIG Room. Check here in coming months for guidance on ways to improve your displays and instructions for shipping them to Hartford if you can't travel with them.  Members’ informative displays include track plan diagrams, layout photographs and 3-D mock-ups, and priority lists of design features to help others learn how others have solved layout design problems. Frequently, the layout designer is available for discussion. Design-related clinic schedules, descriptions of open-house layouts for the Wednesday tour, carpool signup lists, a local restaurant list, and a roommate-wanted list will be available. A bulletin board will have important updates about LDSIG events -- be sure and check daily for activities and schedules. You may catch great discussions from time to time, especially in-between clinics.

Layout Design "Help Desk" –  LDSIG volunteers will be available at several times during the week to provide free sit-down guidance if you are in the process of designing your layout.  To get the most value from these opportunities, do some homework before asking for help: prepare a dimensioned drawing of your layout space, identify your "Givens", "Druthers", and constraints, and bring a map or route schematic of your proposed territory.  Also bring forecasts of the traffic mix and jobs you'd like to feature during your eventual operating sessions

Meet 'n Greet, Sunday

Begin your convention by meeting other attendees who are especially interested in layout design. Hear informal LDSIG-member introductions about their layout design and construction status, plus timely event announcements and networking opportunities. Meet published authors and respected contributors to various email lists. Sunday, 7:00p, in the SIG room.

 

Layout Design Clinics, Monday

Layout Design Clinics  – On Monday, July 12, NMRA75 and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on layout design. The clinics will provide real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout. All these clinics are open to all convention attendees.  

 

Special Layout Design “Bootcamp”

 

 

Former Layout Design Journal editor and custom layout designer Byron Henderson and other members of the NMRA's Layout Design SIG are leading a Layout Design Bootcamp at the NMRA Convention in Milwaukee in 2010.

 

This four-hour clinic begins at 8 am Monday, July 12th and will be an intensive session on track planning and layout design. Discover how to refine vision, concept, and purpose; select layout footprints and schematics; draw accurate and useful plans; create efficient and engaging yards and industrial areas; make best use of staging tracks; maintain space for people; and avoid common track planning errors. Step-by-step examples from a variety of layout designs will be discussed.

 

Whether your dream layout is strongly prototype-based, a creative freelanced theme, or somewhere in between, this practical session will give you the tools and best practices to design a great layout!

 

Among the topics to be covered:

Layout design phases: Conceptual, Structural, and Detail

Developing vision, theme, and purpose

The impact of givens and 'druthers considering space, resources, and skills

Prototype research techniques and tools

The user and viewer experience

Layout footprint techniques

Drawing and rendering tools and best practices

Planning for people

Multi-deck considerations

Yard planning

Staging design

Signature elements vs. typicality

LDEs: Possibilities and pitfalls

Tricky traps of layout design (common errors to avoid)

… and much, much more!

 

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Byron Henderson

Designing with the Designers "Super Clinic"

[This is a three session clinic ending at noon. Come and stay as long as you wish!]

9:30 AM

 

11:00 AM

 

Lunch

1:00 PM

Cal Sexsmith

Track Design for a Prairie Town

2:30 PM

Cal Sexsmith

Running the Buckland Way Freight with TT&TO 

 

 

 

 

Layout Design Clinics, Tuesday

Layout Design Clinics  – On Tuesday, July 13, NMRA75 and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on layout design. The clinics will provide real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout. All these clinics are open to all convention attendees. 

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Greg Johnson

Researching, Designing, and building an HO Scale SP Switching Layout

9:30 AM

Bruce Faulkner

Designing the CSX Shenandoah Division

11:00 AM

Bruce Faulkner

Operating the CSX Shenandoah Division

Lunch

1:00 PM

John Smith

C&O's operations in Northern Ohio

2:30 PM

Greg Johnson

Building and Operating an Industrial Strength Railroad, The Allegheny Terminal 

 

LDSIG Annual Business Meeting, Wednesday, July 14, 8:00AM

LDSIG Annual Meeting – Our annual membership meeting agenda includes officer and volunteer reports. All LDSIG members at the convention are encouraged to participate.  The meeting should end about 9AM so the Milwaukee Layout LDSIG Tour can commence.

 

Milwaukee Layout Tour, Wednesday, July 14

 The Annual meeting will be followed by the traditional Wednesday LD SIG self-guided layout tour. Jeff Markey has planned a tour that includes 21 layouts in the Milwaukee area as well as 8 layouts in northern Illinois. Each of these layouts is a quality example of design, construction or operation.  Jeff has gathered "Layout at a Glance" data and "Special Features" descriptions on all these layouts which will make it easier for you to decide which ones you want to visit.  Click here to see the whole list or click on any individual owner or railroad to jump directly to that information.

There will be no picnic this year.  This event will be extra fare and limited to LDSIG/OpSIG members and families/significant others. 

 

 Another change this year is the transition to the GPS rather than maps for navigation.  So if you own a portable GPS. please bring it to the convention.  Every Car will need One!

 To assist your planning of your personal layout tour route, we have added a column in the spreadsheet below after the owner's name, which indicates the travel time from the convention hotel.  An approximate location of the layouts is shown on a map available by clicking here.  The actual addresses will be handed out to ticket holders at the convention.

 Note: The Layouts will be open at different times depending on location.  The Illinois Layouts (Numbers 22 to 29) will be open from 10AM until 5PM except layouts 28 and 29 which will be open from 10AM to 9PM.  The Wisconsin Layouts (Numbers 1-21) will be open from 1PM until 9PM except for layouts #15 and #18 which will be open from 11AM to 4PM.  Please observe these hours of operation.  Thank you.

 

  Owner      Drive Time 

                    from hotel

Scale

Railroad Name           

Era

Size

Scenery

Control

 

 

 

 

 

1. Ken Jaglinski          10     

HO/HOn3

  Ashland, Superior & Pacific

Transition

11X37 & 10X21

100%

NCE

 

 

 

2. Don Drum              20

HO

  Chicagoand NorthWestern System

1956-1960

1140 sq ft

97%

DC PSI walk around

 

 

 

3. Jerry Gunderson     20

N

  FordCityNorthern Railway

Modern 2005-present

15 X 11

95%

NCE

 

 

 

4. Bob Zoeller (NAPM) 25

HO

 North American Prototype Modelers

Late 1940's to April 30, 1971

 4000 sq ft

          60%

 NCE

 

 

 

5. Tim Hensch           30

HO

  Norfolk & Whey Railroad

Modern 

26 X 36

25%

NCE

 

 

 

6. Bob Frey               35

HO

  U.P. & Western Railroads

Summer, 1950-59

26 X 30 X 40 X 10

98%

Digitrax

 

 

 

 

7. Keith Schmidt (MNSE)  

                                35

N

 MilwaukeeN Southeastern

Transition

17 X 40

95%

Aristocraft/System One

 

 

 

 

8. Ken Thompson       45

HO

  BurlingtonNorthern Railroad  - Peoria Subdivision

Spring 1973

36 X 22

75%

Dynatrol/Rail-Lynx

 

 

 

 

9. Marcel Trautwein    45

HO

  The Grand De Elusion

1940-1950

25 X 25

100%

DCC

 

 

 

 

10. David Popp           50

N

  The Naugatuck Valley RR

Fall 1958

13 X 17

90%

Lenz

 

 

 

 

11. Rolf Plachter         50

HO

  Midwest Lines

1964

33 X 52

        100%

Lenz

 

 

 

 

12. Marty Edwards      55

HO

  The ‘400’ Route

1935-1952

21 X 21

100%

Atlas DCC

 

 

 

 

13. Dan Dyer              60

HO

  BurlingtonNorthern River Division

Mid-70's - early 80's

32 X 36

10%

DCC

 

 

 

 

14. Dennis Glynn        70

HO

  BlueMountainand Cascade

1946

 Full basement

 

DCC

 

 

 

 

15. Andy Sperandeo    45

HO

  Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry.

1947

38' 6" X 44' 6"

              .    -       None

NCE

 

 

 

 

16. Stan Olander         40

HO

  CORNBELT NORTHERN

early 1950's      

"L" 15 X 25 and 15 X 50

80%

Lenz

 

 

 

 

17. Jim Hediger           55

HO

  OhioSouthern

early 1970's

"L" 22 X 28

70%

DC Block walk around

 

 

 

 

18. Kent Johnson        45

O-Hi Rail

 CP and CN based

 present

 14 X 48

          70%

 TMCC

 

 

 

 

19. Tim Scott              50

HO

  Northwoods Route

1957

25 X 17

75%

MRC DC Memory walk around

 

 

 

 

20 Jim Kelly                25

N

                     

  Tehachapi subdivision

1983

18.5 X 19

20%

System One/NCE

 

 

 

 

21. Jim Lorbiecki         30

HO

  The Northwest Timberline

Transition

4 X 20 X 28

100%

DC

 

 

 

 

22. Don Cook              65

HO

 Great Northern - Spokane Division

 ~1949

28 X 17 and 10 X 6 

          98%

 NCE

 

 

 

 

23. Dan Sylvester        65

HOn3

  Rio GrandeSouthern

1930's

4 X 8

100%

PFM (modified)

 

 

 

 

24. Jim Spice              60

HO

  Denver & CatCanyon

1953

30 X 30

98%

NCE

 

 

 

 

25. Bob Perrin             70

HO

 Illinois Central, St Louis Div

 May - Jun 1966

 92 X 32

          10%

 Digitrax

 

 

 

 

26. Greg Bedlek          75

HO

 GNP Hydra Route

 1970

 2700 sq ft

          80%

 Lenz

 

 

 

 

27. Harry Schildkraut   60

HO

  New York, Ontario& Western

Now

30 X 50

75%

Digitrax

 

 

 

 

28. Mike Ritschdorff    105

HO

  N&W Pocahontas Division 1958

1958

25 X 41

100%

Lenz

 

 

29. Ted Schnepf          115

O

 Milwaukee Road - Dubuque, Iowa & Dakota Divs

 1954, 1929

 4100 sq ft

          50%

 NCE

 

 

 

Layout Design Clinics and Forums, Thursday

Layout Design Clinics  – On Thursday, July 15, NMRA75 and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on layout design. The clinics will provide real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout. All these clinics are open to all convention attendees. 

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Tony Thompson

More Prototypical Waybills 

9:30 AM

Ted Pamperin

Improved 4 Cycle Waybills

11:00 AM

Gerry Albers

Planning for Signals Forum

Lunch

1:00 PM

 

Turnout Considerations for Layout Designers  

2:30 PM

 

Improving track Plan Graphics

 

Friday Layout Design Clinics and Banquet

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Train Show starting at 9 AM for all those registered for the convention

9:30 AM

11:00 AM

Lunch

1:00 PM

 

 

2:30 PM

 John Young

 C&O Saginnaw Sub in N Scale

4:00 PM

Robert Reid

Layout Designs for a Small Room

 

Friday LDSIG Banquet  

The LDSIG Banquet is being planned for Friday evening at Mader's which is a famous German restaurant in Milwaukee.  It will be a full German style buffet with all the well known German dishes - sauerbraten, kassler rippchen, hungarian goulash, German sausage platter plus a fish dish, beer battered cod, and of course a large selection of German beers! (Cash bar though). 


 

Sunday, LDSIG Drive Out Tours

Mike Ritschdorff will have his layout open on Sunday.   Greg Bedlek will be open Saturday following the convention.  There is information about both layouts in the Wednesday Tour Section above. Ted Schenpf will also be open on the Sunday following.  [See information about Ted's open house at the top of the LDSIG events above.]   For more information contact Seth Neumann via email (click here).

 

 

Sacramento Convention 2011

Last Updated June 10, 2011

   

The 2011 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Sacramento July 3-9, 2011. 

Information on the NMRA Convention is available at the official site http://www.x2011west.org/

The LDSIG page is now officially on the convention website at http://www.x2011west.org/ldsig.html

If you have questions or would like to get involved before or during the convention, please contact the LDSIG local events coordinator,  Seth Neumann via email at sneumann at pacbell dot net or click anywhere in this paragraph.  

Note: Watch this site for updates on clinics, forums, layout tour information and other convention activities.

 

Advance Section LDSIG Tours, Friday, July 1 to Sunday, July 3

 

The LDSIG does not have any special events for the Advance Section but many of the layouts have special interest.  These layouts are available via both bus tours and self-drive tours.  The self-drive tours have no additional charge beyond the registration for the Advance Section.  The tours are organized geographically on separate days starting July 1. 

The Advance Section Self-Drive Tours (and bus tours) are posted at http://www.x2011west.org/advsecTable.php 

Here is a listing of the Self-drive tours:

SAL01 -- Santa Cruz Friday afternoon
SAL02 -- On the way Friday afternoon (Gilroy, Morgan HIll, San Jose)
SAL03 -- Southeast Bay Friday evening (San Jose over to Pleasanton)
SAL11 -- Southwest Bay Saturday morning (San Jose up to Palo Alto)
SAL14 -- Northeast Bay Saturday afternoon (around Oakland and Walnut Creek)
SAL21 -- Northeaast Bay Sunday morning (SF peninsula)
SAL22 -- On the way Sunday afternoon (nominally out the I-80 corridor)

While the "Design Oriented" layouts are not broken out separately, many Bay Area layouts are available on a self-guided basis including most of the regulars on the Bay Area SIG meet tour.  Here are a few of the layouts on the list.  For a full list click here.

Dave Adams D&RGW Durlin Branch On3

Charlie Bedard Agassiz Baisin Railway HO

Robert Bowidige SP HO

Jack Burgess Yosemite Valley HO 

Cal Central Club California Central Lines HO & HOn3

Jim Dias Western Pacific 3rd Sub 

HO Rick Fortin Santa Fe Valley Division 4th District HO

Howard Lloyd Claremont Docks HO 

Ed Loizeaux New York Central System S

Frank Markovich On3 Nov/Dec 2010 NG & SL Gazette 

Seth Neumann UP Niles Canyon HO

Bob Osborn Chicago & Mackinac RR HO

David Parks Cumberland, MD (WM/B&O) HO

Kermit Paul Lone Pine & Tonopah HO

Silicon Valley Lines Silicon Valley Lines HO

Andy Schnur C&O Alleghany Sub HO

Ted Stephens Ohio & Little Kanawah RR HO

Jim Vail Glenwood and Black Creek Narrow Gauge RR HOn3


Most of these layouts have descriptions and photos posted on the BayRails site: 

http://www.bayrails.com/layouts.php 

 

SIG Room, All Week

LDSIG Exhibit Room, Sunday, July 3 through Saturday, July 9 

All week long you can make the SIG room the place to be. We are sharing the room with the Operations Special Interest Group which is planning a full round of operations during the convention.  Make the SIG Room your convention headquarters networking opportunities, meeting others for planning, designing, building, and operating considerations intended for your dream layout.

 

 

SIG Room Hours

Open

Close

Sunday

7 PM

10:30 PM

Monday - Tuesday

7:30 AM

10:30 PM

Wednesday

7:30 AM

12:00 Noon

Thursday

7:30 AM

10:30 PM

Friday

7:30 AM

5:00 PM

Saturday

8:00 AM

12:00 Noon

 Displays & LDSIG Desk – in the SIG Room. Check here in coming months for guidance on ways to improve your displays and instructions for shipping them to Sacramento if you can't travel with them.  Members’ informative displays include track plan diagrams, layout photographs and 3-D mock-ups, and priority lists of design features to help others learn how others have solved layout design problems. Frequently, the layout designer is available for discussion. Design-related clinic schedules, descriptions of open-house layouts for the Wednesday tour, carpool signup lists, a local restaurant list, and a roommate-wanted list will be available. A bulletin board will have important updates about LDSIG events - be sure to check daily for activities and schedules.  You may catch great discussions from time to time, especially in-between clinics.

Layout Design Consultation Services –  LDSIG volunteers will be available at several times during the week to provide free sit-down guidance if you are in the process of designing your layout.  To get the most value from these opportunities, do some homework before asking for help: prepare a dimensioned drawing of your layout space, identify your "Givens", "Druthers", and constraints, and bring a map or route schematic of your proposed territory.  Also bring forecasts of the traffic mix and jobs you'd like to feature during your eventual operating sessions

Meet 'n Greet, Sunday

Begin your convention by meeting other attendees who are especially interested in layout design. Hear informal LDSIG-member introductions about their layout design and construction status, plus timely event announcements and networking opportunities. Meet published authors and respected contributors to various email lists. Sunday, 7:00p, in the SIG room.  Don't worry about arriving late if you're enjoying tours and op sessions on the way up from Advanced Section, we'll be there until at least 10:00PM!

 

Layout Design Clinics, Monday

Layout Design Clinics  – On Monday, July 4,  X2011 West and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on layout design. The clinics will provide real examples of design challenges and solutions to assist you in designing your dream layout. All these clinics are open to all convention attendees. 

 

Special Layout Design “Bootcamp”

 

Layout Design Journal editor and custom layout designer Byron Henderson and other members of the NMRA's Layout Design SIG are leading a Layout Design Bootcamp at the X2011 Unconventional Convention in Sacramento.

 

This four-hour clinic begins at 8 am Monday, July 3, 2011, and will be an intensive session on track planning and layout design. Discover how to refine vision, concept, and purpose; select layout footprints and schematics; draw accurate and useful plans; create efficient and engaging yards and industrial areas; make best use of staging tracks; maintain space for people; and avoid common track planning errors. Step-by-step examples from a variety of layout designs will be discussed.

 

Whether your dream layout is strongly prototype-based, a creative freelanced theme, or somewhere in between, this practical session will give you the tools and best practices to design a great layout!

 

Among the topics to be covered:

Layout design phases: Conceptual, Structural, and Detail

Developing vision, theme, and purpose

The impact of givens and 'druthers considering space, resources, and skills

Prototype research techniques and tools

The user and viewer experience

Layout footprint techniques

Drawing and rendering tools and best practices

Planning for people

Multi-deck considerations

Yard planning

Staging design

Signature elements vs. typicality

LDEs: Possibilities and pitfalls

Tricky traps of layout design (common errors to avoid)

… and much, much more!

  

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Byron Henderson

 

Designing with the Designers “Super Clinic”

[This is a three session clinic ending at noon. Come and stay as long as you wish!]

9:30 AM

11:00 AM

Lunch

2:30 PM

Robert Clark

Layout Design for Passenger Operations

4:00 PM

Panel

What Would You Do Differently? 

Dinner

7:00 PM

Bob Jacobsen

Open LCB

Note: Bob’s clinic is repeated Friday evening at 7PM.

7:00 PM

Jim Betz

Layout Design Tricks

 

 

Layout Design Clinics, Tuesday

Layout Design Clinics  – On Tuesday, July 5, X2011 West and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting more clinics focusing on layout design.  All these clinics are open to all convention attendees.

  

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Steve Gust

Introduction to Dispatching

9:30 AM

Tony Koester

Multi-deck Layout Design

9:30 AM

 

Dave Clemens

 

 

Introduction to Timetable Train Order Dispatching

 

Lunch

1:00 PM

Steve Gust

 Modern Verbal Authority

(Track Warrants and Direct Traffic Control)

Dinner

7:00 PM

Gust, Flynn, Zinnecker, Atkins

 CTC Panel with Dispatchers and Signalmen 

8:00 PM

Tommy Johnson

Workin’ on the Railroad: Random Thoughts on Prototype Operations

  

LDSIG Annual Business Meeting, Wednesday, July 6, 8:00AM

LDSIG Annual Meeting – Our annual membership meeting agenda includes officer and volunteer reports. All LDSIG members at the convention are encouraged to participate.  The meeting should end about 9AM so the Sacramento LDSIG Layout Tour can commence.

 

Sacramento Layout Tour, Wednesday, July 6

 The Annual meeting will be followed by the traditional Wednesday LD SIG self-guided layout tour. Dave Bayless has planned a tour that includes 18 layouts in the Greater Sacrameto area.  Each of these layouts is a quality example of design, construction or operation.  We have gathered information on each layout which is posted on a special layout tour page which will will make it easier for you to decide which ones you want to visit.  Click here to see the whole list or click on any individual owner or railroad in the table below to jump directly to information about that layout.  There is also a map available on the special layout tour page

 

Here is a table of the layouts and some information about each to help you with your convention planning. Note: The color in the third column generally shows when the layout is open - morning (peach), afternoon (green), late afternoon (violet), evening (blue).  We have also added zipcodes and city locations for pre-planning purposes. 

 

#
Name
RR Name
Direction from Sacramento & Hours Layout Open
Scale
Size
Scenery
 Times of travel from Convention Center/ City/ Zip
Comments and Interesting Design Points
worth visiting.
1
North
Morning only 9a-12pm
 
HO
33 X 10
20%
Travel Time: (33 miles) / 39” minutes/
Plumas Lake (Olivehurst),
95961
Mid 80’s HO California Oregon & Western Shortline on SP Modoc Line.
Ops in and around Klamath Falls. Uses JMRI operations with a CTC panel, Novel helix construction, Lower level staging and walk-around design. Track/Bench stag.
2
Northwest
Morning
10a-3pm
 
HO
24 X 42 +
1208 Sq Ft
20%
Travel Time: (68 miles) / 76” minutes/
Colusa, 95932
SP Dunsmuir Route mostly built full scale to SP drawings, in an upstairs bonus room, innovative multi-tier, most level 2
to 3 track in place, walk-around design, scenery well along,  
3
Pacific Northwest around Portland
Northeast
Morning and Afternoon 9:30a-4pm
N
20 X 20
90% +
Travel Time: (65 miles) / 80” minutes/
Nevada City,
 95959
A very long distance but worth it. Innovative N-Scale Northwest railroad with signaling, electronics and staging “beyond the basement” concept. JMRI & Panel Pro, signaled, can use internet to dispatch, walk-in multi tier design, fully scenicked.
4
Northeast
Morning and Afternoon
 10a-3pm
HO
20 X 20
None
Travel Time: (35 miles) / 43” minutes/
 Auburn, 95603
Non-Operating, only ½ lower Staging yard built, but benchwork footprint in and extensive multi-level design. Built lean-to at back of train room to hold part of helix. Planned 6 tiers, walk-in design, models Mtn grade in NorWst. Working Signal/CTC display.
5
Northeast
Morning
9am-2pm
HO
Over 500 sq ft
70%
Travel Time: (38 miles) / 46” minutes/
Auburn, 95603
 
Impressive purpose-built building, Large Layout, Good Quality, Step-Down walkway under layout, Multi-Tier walk-around design, Helix room w/dispatcher, central hidden branch.  Union Pacific in the Wasatch Range in Utah including coal operations.
6
Northeast
Morning
9a-12pm
HO
 15 X 20
 20%
Travel Time: (17 miles) / 24” minutes/
Citrus Heights,
95610
 
Again, Dave Clemens recommended this attic layout. Proto-Freelanced 1960’s in Sac Valley, including Sacramento Northern and Western Pacific
Stacked Staging, Helix in Dormer, walk-in with center peninsula, built 6’h hallway to access.
7
Northeast
Morning
930a-1230pm plus
Afternoon 2p-5p
HO
270 Sq Ft
bedroom
90% +
Travel Time: (24 miles) / 30” minutes/
Rocklin, 95677
 
UP RR in and out of Spokane, noteworthy double tier, doormino type construction with hidden loop staging under and stub-end staging behind low backdrop.
8
Northeast
Morning and Afternoon
 10a-4pm
HO (WP,SP), HOn3 (Proto-lanced)
 2800 sq ft
 75%
Travel Time: (10 miles) / 14” minutes/
Sacramento,
95838
Main Layout is walk-around double tier and narrow gauge is also walk-around. Location is WP Feather River Canyoun with SP Cal-P line and freelanced HOn3 in a separate room.  Interesting peninsula treatment at the end, using CMRI for signaling, Club is building their own searchlight signals, have old authentic WP CTC machine, semi-proto model.
9
Northeast
Morning and Afternoon 1:00pm-6pm
HO
 45 X 35
 
 
 20%
Travel Time: (25 miles) / 41” minutes/
Granite Bay,
95746

 
1950 SP Sierra Donner Pass layout utilizes a novel computer controlled signaling system with touch screens to operate turnouts. RR & Co software used for controlling turnouts, routes, signals, & accessories and to detect occupancy.  NCE DCC for train control with 70 individual blocks. Dual track 550' mainline with 18 track main yard and 10 track hidden yard. Track elevation ranges between 50" and 77" with a 1.5% max grade and 48" min radius. L girder construction with spline roadbed. Layout in operation for over 1 year using timetable and car card system. Dedicated building houses layout.
10
Northeast
Morning and Evening
12p-8pm
HO
12 X 55
90% +
Travel Time: (26 miles) / 36” minutes/
Rocklin, 95765
 
Large 2-tier Layout with backdrops, staging and plenty of online switching, innovative walk-under layout entance to step up elevated platform, Loop staging, DCC
11
 
 
South Placer Lines
Northeast
Afternoon and Evening
11a-6pm
HO
~ 400 sq ft
40%
Travel Time: (22 miles) / 28” minutes/
Rocklin, 95677
 
Freelance 1940’s shortline to Placerville, Point to point with staging yards each end, 192 foot mainline run, 3 lines of track crosses doorway with creative lift-out access, fascias. Shelf bracket tier construction.
12
 
 
Northeast
Evening
4p-10pm
HO
 25 X 35
 100%
Travel Time: (12 miles) / 21” minutes/
Rancho Cordova,
95670
 
Large walkaround but somewhat dated, freelanced. Built in an SP looking RR station. Some double decking, makes use of small staging yards. Nice workshop area and lounge also.
13
Northeast
Afternoon and Evening
3p-10pm
HO
15 X 37
50%
Travel Time: (23 miles) / 36” minutes/
Folsom, 95630
 
UP Railroad Portland to Pocatello Walk-In around the room double tier with memorable scenes on a shelf-like layout featuring a helix and staging. Prototype modeling, DCC.
14
Northeast
Evening
6pm-9pm
HO
 Open basement
 
15 X 30
 None
 
Note: This layout is still in the design stage.
Travel Time: (21 miles) / 28” minutes/
Roseville, 95661
 
Dave Clemens agreed to be there to help visitors understand the track plan as Dave has designed it for George’s large vacant railroad room.
15
Northeast
Evening
6pm-9pm
N
11 X 26
50%
Travel Time: (21 miles) / 29” minutes/
Rocklin, 95677
 
Flowing Walk-around layout with deep fascia, under layout fascia panels, valence, backdrops, high quality scenery, open staging area, lighting.
16
South
Evening
6p-10pm
HO
22 X 18
30%
Travel Time: (15 miles) / 21” minutes/
Elk Grove, 95758
 
Modern ATSF through the Dessert, 1983, Clovis, New Mexico to Amarillo, Texas. 
17
South
Afternoon and Evening
3p-10pm
HO
20 X 20
50%
Travel Time: (42 miles) / 46” minutes/
Mirada (Stockton),
95212
 
Freelanced but large mountain RR with his favorite scenes from his long RR career, walk-in & around, multi-level, RR themed building
18
 
South
Morning to Evening 
10a-8pm
HO
Over 500 sq ft
70%
Travel Time: (71 miles) / 75” minutes/
Tracy, 95376
 
Well worth visiting. Innovative Mushroom and multi-tier layout, good model work, fabulous design ideas, railroad engulfs viewer, nice fascia and valance.

 

 

 

  Everyone on the LDSIG Layout Tour will receive a polo shirt with a special logo.

 

This event will be extra fare.  This year the tour will be unlimited and open to anyone registered for convention.  This is a self-drive tour and we encourage carpooling for enjoyable discussions of the layouts visited as you travel from one layout to the next.  As private transportation will be used, insurance is to be provided by the participants in the Tour.  Neither the LDSIG, Inc. nor the NMRA will provide insurance coverage for private or rental transportation.  

There will be no picnic this year.  Food stops may be taken at your convenience and your choice of cuisine.

 We are continuing our use of GPS from last year's convention rather than maps for navigation.  So if you own a portable GPS. please bring it to the convention.  Every Car will need One!

   

 

 

Layout Design Clinics and Forums, Thursday

 

Layout Design Clinics  – On Thursday, July 7, X2011 and the LDSIG and the OpSIG will be presenting an all day series of clinics focusing on Signaling.  All these clinics are open to all convention attendees. 

 

 

Time

Presenter

     Title

8:00 AM to Noon

California State                   While not a clinic in the normal expectation, this

Railroad Museum                 special visit with the California State Railroad

Signal Maintainers                Museum Musem signal maintainers will be a great 

                                               introduction to the afternoon's clinics.  We will see and

                                               understand the operation of prototype signals.  Includes

                                               a train ride.  

                                         Sign up at http://www.x2011west.org/generalTable.php#P523  

Lunch

1:00 PM

Seth Neumann                     Introduction to Signals for your Model Railroad  

2:30 PM

David Metal                         Making Your Own Signals and Controllers

4:00 PM

Dick Bronson                       JMRI: Loconet Signaling 

Dinner

7:00PM

Bruce Chubb                        Signaling Your Model Railroad Part I

8:30 PM

Bruce Chubb                        Signaling Your Model Railroad Part II

10:00 PM

Steve Moore                         Track Planning and Layout Design

Bruce Chubb                        Signaling Your Model Railroad Part III

 Note:  Bruce Chubb’s three clinics will be repeated Saturday afternoon starting at 1PM.

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Train Show, and Layout Design Clinics

 

 

Layout Design Clinics  – On Friday, July 8,  we encourage you to attend the National Train Show at the Convention center and then return to some additional clinics before you join us for the SIG Banquet.  All these clinics are open to all convention attendees. 

  

 

 

Time

Presenter

Title

9:00 AM

Train Show starting at 9 AM for all those registered for the convention.  Public admitted after Noon

 

 

Lunch

1:00 PM

 

 

2:00 PM

 Rodney Black

 CATS - A Modern Dispatching Console based on JMRI

4:00 PM

Joe Melhorn

& Dave Megeath

Trackside Signaling System at the Sacramento Model Railroad Historical Society

Dinner

7:00 PM

Bob Jacobsen

Open LCB

 

Friday SIG Banquet

Friday SIG Banquet  (All are welcome!)  

6:00 PM to 10:00 PM No-host Bar from 6:00 PM

Enjoy a catered dinner in the roundhouse display area of the California State Railroad Museum with fellow SIG members.  Sig membership is not required, all convention attendees with an interest in layout design are welcome!  There will be an after-dinner presentation by a Don Mitchell, prominent layout designer.  There will also be a brief presentation by Bruce Chubb about the 2012 Grand Rapids NMRA Convention and talk about his Sunset Valley Oregon System   A great opportunity to discuss everything you've seen during X2011 West and reflect on how to apply your learnings to your layout!

Price: $62  (limit 125)

 

  [Proof reading assistance from Bruce Notman and Travers Stavac greatfully acknowledged]

 

 

Grand Rapids Convention 2012

The 2012 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Grand Rapids, MI on July 29 - August 4, 2012.

Information on the NMRA Convention is available by clicking Grand Rapids above.  More specific information on the LDSIG Convention activities is available below and also on the LDSIG page on the Grand Rapids site.

 

The Major LDSIG activities at the convention are the Clinics, the Tuesday Tour, the Wednesday Tour, and the Banquet.

 

SIG Room

Meet and Greet, Sunday, July 29, 7-10 PM

We will hold our traditional Meet and Greet in the SIG Room providing an opportunity for all Layout Design and Operations SIG members and friends to introduce themselves and their intersts.  don't worry about arriving late if you're enjoying tours and op sessions, we'll be there until at least 10:00 PM.

Displays and Consulting

The Sig Room will be open Monday to Thursday from 8AM to 10PM.  It is a great place to congregate, meet friends, make friends, enjoy the SIG Room Displays, get or give layout design consultation or generally take a break from other convention activities.  Jeff Markey is coordinating the layout design consultation this year and is looking for members to provide some advice to others.  If you are willing to consult for an hour or so during the convention please contact Jeff at jhmarkey at comcast dot net.  Please consider doing this if you are able it is very rewarding for both the consultant and the person looking for help.  Also make sure you stop by the LDSIG desk to update your personal information.

 

Clinics

 

There will be several Layout Design cliinics presented during the convention.  Most will be held in the Haldane Room on the third floor of the Convention Hotel.  Here is the current schedule of clinics.

Monday Clinics

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Seth Neumann 

Layout Design Boot Camp

[This is a two session clinic ending at 11. Come and stay as long as you wish!]

9:30 AM

11:00 AM

Lunch

1:00 PM

Ken Cameron

Running with TT/TO 

2:30 PM

Ken Cameron

Trainsheets, MMI and other Verbal Authorities 

Dinner

 

Tuesday Clinics

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Robert Reid

 

Layout Design 101

9:30 AM

 Robert Reid

 

Layout Design 101: Vertical Thinking

11:00 AM

 Cal Sexsmith

 Car Cards & Waybills - How I Use Them

Lunch

1:00 PM

 

 

2:30 PM

Jim Dahlberg

Modeling an Anthracite Road 

Dinner

Thursday Clinics

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

Doug Harding

 

Meat Packing Plants: Prototype and Model

9:30 AM

 Doug Harding

 

Operations of Meat Packing Plants and Meat Traffic

11:00 AM

 Andy Sperandeo

 Freight Yard Design

Lunch

1:00 PM

Andy Sperandeo

 "New Presentation"

2:30 PM

Panel

What Would You Do Differently? 

Dinner

Friday Clinics

Time

Presenter

Title

8:00 AM

 

 

9:30 AM

 

 

 

11:00 AM

 

 

Lunch

1:00 PM

 

 

2:30 PM

Doug Tagsold

Railroads of Toledo 

Dinner

 

Tuesday Layout Tour

The LDSIG will have a special layout tour to the Detroit area about 2 1/2 hours from the convention.  There are several layouts of interest there.  Descriptions of the layouts and some photos may be found here.

 

Wednesday, 8 - 9 AM

LDSIG Business Meeting

Meet in the SIG Room for important updates and discussions.

 

Wednesday Layout Tour

9AM to 10 PM

A selection of about 15 layouts of special interest to layout designers, some of which are not available through the general convention Layout Tour packages.  Carpooling is strongly encouraged so you can discuss the unique features of these layouts as you travel.  No lunch is provided so you and your carpool buddies can eat what and when you want (there are plenty of good restaurants in all categories and price ranges along the route).  Includes commemorative polo shirt.  A summary map and list of addresses will be provided so bring your GPS.

For a quick summary of the layouts on the tour, go to http://www.gr2012.org/ldsig.htm and scroll down to "LDSig Layout List".

 

LDSIG/OPSIG Banquet

Friday, August 3,

6:30 to 9:30PM

This years banquet will be held in the Imperial Ballroom in the Convention Hotel.  After dinner you'll be treated to a presentation by Andy Sperandeo.  See (Form 4) fo menu selections and pricing.  If registering online, go to the SIG Membership and SIG Events icon, then LDSIG/OPSIG Banquet icon and select your choice of entre.  Refer to Ticket Codes S501-Chicken; S502-Beef; S503-Fish; S504-Vegan for meal choices.

Atlanta Convention 2013

The 2013 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Atlanta, GA on July 14-20, 2013.

Information on the NMRA Convention is available by clicking here.  More specific information on the LDSIG Convention activities is available below.  This site is currently being updated frequently and more information will be available here soon.

The major LDSIG activities at the Convention will be the clinics, the Wednesday tour and the banquet. 

ALL OF THE LDSIG ACTIVITIES ARE OPEN TO ALL CONVENTION ATTENDEES.

We do welcome interested model railroaders not already members of the Layout Design Special Interest Group to join.  Memberships are available at the Peachtree Express 2013 Company Store LDSIG Section.

SIG Room

Meet and Greet, Sunday, July 14, 7-10 PM

We will hold our traditional Meet and Greet in the SIG Room providing an opportunity for all Layout Design and Operations SIG members and friends to introduce themselves and their interests, and find folks who can share ideas and solutions to your layout design and operation concerns.  We have invited owners of the Wednesday Layout Tour to provide a preview of the Tour.  It is also a time to arrange car pools for the Wednesday Layout Tour.  Do not worry about arriving late if your're enjoying tours and op sessions, we will be there until at least 10:00 PM. 

Displays and Consulting 

The SIG Room will be open Monday to Thursday from 8AM to 10PM.  It is a great place to congregate, meet friends, make friends, enjoy the SIG Room Displays, get or give layout design consultation, or generally take a break from other convention activities. 

Layout Design Help Sessions (Monday through Friday - Open to all) 

Members of the LDSIG will be offering free half-hour layout help sessions.  Limited availability, sign up in person in the SIG Room during the Convention. 

Help Providers Needed!

Help-provider volunteers are crucially needed.  We need experienced LDSIG members volunteers to provide half-hour layout design help sessions during the Convention.  This offers a service to the hobby and promotes the SIG.  Each volunteer will be asked to set aside one, two or more hours during the Convention when they can commit to being available for help sessions.  It is very important that we have volunteers and hours confirmed before the Convention begins.  To volunteer, or for questions, contact LDJ Editor Byron Henderson, ldjeditor at gmail.dot com, who is coordinating the help sessions.

Clinics 

There will be several Layout Design clinics presented during the convention.  Beyond the Layout Design Bootcamp described immediately following, there are clinics by Bernie Kempinski, Seth Neumann, Byron Henderson, Tony Koester, Steve Prevette, Bruce Faulkner, Gerry Fitzgerald, Bill Kaufman and Bruce Metcalf.  Go here for times and descriptions of these clinics.  All the LDSIG clinics, including the Layout Design Bootcamp are open to all Convention Attendees.

Layout Design Bootcamp, Monday, July 15, 2013, 8 to Noon 

Layout Design Journal editor and custom layout designer Byron Henderson and other members of the NMRA's Layout Design SIG are leading a Layout Design Bootcamp at the Peachtree Express 2013 NMRA Convention in Atlanta.

Due to facilities issues, the Layout Design SIG Bootcamp 4-hour "super clinic" at the Atlanta NMRA Convention has been moved. The new (and better) location is a short indoor walk away from the LDSIG Room and will be found in the adjacent Renaissance Atlanta Waverly Hotel (the Convention's official hotel). We'll be in the Stanhope Conference Room on the first floor.

We'll still begin at 8:00 AM Monday, July 15 with LDSIG President Seth Neumann and LDJ Editor Byron Henderson as your friendly presenters..  The Bootcamp is an intensive session on track planning and layout design. Discover how to refine vision, concept, and purpose; select layout footprints and schematics; draw accurate and useful plans; create efficient and engaging yards and industrial areas; make best use of staging tracks; maintain space for people; and avoid common track planning errors. Step-by-step examples from a variety of layout designs will be discussed.

Whether your dream layout is strongly prototype-based, a creative freelanced theme, or somewhere in between, this practical session will give you the tools and best practices to design a great layout!

Among the topics to be covered:

  • Layout design phases: Conceptual, Structural, and Detail
  • Developing vision, theme, and purpose
  • The impact of givens and 'druthers considering space, resources, and skills
  • Prototype research techniques and tools
  • The user and viewer experience
  • Layout footprint techniques
  • Drawing and rendering tools and best practices
  • Planning for people
  • Multi-deck considerations
  • Yard planning
  • Staging design
  • Signature elements vs. typicality
  • LDEs: Possibilities and pitfalls
  • Tricky traps of layout design (common errors to avoid)
  • Layout design for operation 
  •  

… and much, much more!

Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 8-9 AM, LDSIG Annual Meeting 

Meet in the SIG Room for important updates and discussions. 

Wednesday Layout Tour, July 17, 2013

A selection of 13 layouts of special interest to layout designers are on this year's tour. 

Carpooling is strongly encouraged so you can discuss the unique features of these layouts as you travel.  Sign-ups for carpools will be posted in the SIG room.  On the LDSIG tour, one can stay as long as one wishes to study a particularly interesting layout or design element.  The hosts are aware of SIG members' interest and are happy to answer questions.  All this makes the tour an invaluable learning experience.

No lunch is provided so you and your carpool buddies can eat what and when you want (there are plenty of good restaurants in all categories and price ranges along the route). 

A summary map and list of addresses will be provided but no detailed maps so bring your GPS.

Everyone on the LDSIG Layout Tour will receive a polo shirt with a special logo.

The following layouts will be on the Tour

  • Jared Harper’s Alma branch of the ATSF
  •  
  • John and Liz Rieken’s HO scale layout terminal operations in the Chicago area
  •  
  • Mike Devaney’s massive N scale C&O
  •  
  • Joe Sullivan’s Gainesville & Tennessee subdivision of the L&N is a large N scale multi-deck layout
  •  
  • Mike Deaton’s Colorado Joint Line Railway system is a large multi-deck HO scale
  •  
  • Phillip and Linda Stead’s’ D&RGW San Juan Division is a wonderfully executed On3
  •  
  • Mike Paslawskyj’s Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 
  •  
  • Alan Hirschfield focuses on mountain railroading in Colorado and Utah; specifically the BNSF and UP lines.
  •  
  • Larry Daughtry’s Kansas City & Port Arthur railroad
  •  
  • Dr. Paul Schenk’s hybrid B&O and B&M layout
  •  
  • Bob McIntyre's Susquehana Valley & Southern
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  • Crew Heimer's Western & Atlantic
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  • Morris E. Smith's Mule Shoe & Western Railroad Co.

More details on these layouts is available on the Wednesday Layout Tour page.

To register for the Wednesday SIG Tour go to the Peachtree Express 2013 Company Store LDSIG/OPSIG Section. 

LDSIG/OPSIG Banquet Friday July 19,  4PM

This year's banquet will be held at Trackside Grill in Kennesaw, GA (about 16 miles NW of the convention site).  The banquet will start with cocktail hour at 4 PM, Southern dinner with the "fixins" at 5 PM, followed by a special program at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History.  We will hear from our speaker, Scott Chatfield (who helped arrange LDSIG functions at the 1995 Atlanta convention).  We will have access to the museum from 6 to 10 PM.   The museum is just across the parking lot from the Trackside Grill.  The museum is the home of the locomotive General from the great locomotive chase during the Civil War.  Tickets for this event will be limited.  

Watch here for more details.

 

To register for the Friday SIG Banquet go to the Peachtree Express 2013 Company Store LDSIG/OPSIG Section. 

2013 Wednesday Layout Tour

The LDSIG is looking forward to welcoming our members to Atlanta for the 2013 NMRA National convention.

The LDSIG Wednesday Layout Tour is open to all Convention Attendees.  The Tour includes a specially designed shirt customized for the Atlanta Convention.  Tickets for the tour are available through the Company Store.

In the past these tours have served to highlight some of the more innovative layouts being constructed in the host city and this year will be no exception.

Here is a map with the approximate locations of the tour layouts.  A detailed handout to the layout locations will be provided at the convention to those who have signed up for the Wednesday layout tour.

  

Key to Map locations:

Click on the owners name or railroad and go to a page with more details and photographs.

1 Joe Sullivan’s L&N Gainesville & Tennessee subdivision  10-5

2 Paul Schenk’s hybrid B&O and B&M    1:30 to 6

3 Bob McIntyre's Susquehana Valley & Southern  9:30 to 3

3 Mike Deaton’s CJL Railway system   10 to 4 

4 Mike Paslawskyj’s Delaware, Lackawanna & Western   10 to 4 

4 Morris E. Smith's Mule Shoe & Western Railroad Co.   10 to 4

5 Phillip and Linda Stead’s’ D&RGW San Juan Division    9 to 5 

6 John Rieken’s Transcon Four      11 to 6

7 Jared Harper’s Alma branch of the ATSF   11 to 4 

8 Mike Devaney's C&O  10 to 2

9 Larry Daughtry’s Kansas City & Port Arthur Railroad     1:30 to 4 

   10 Alan Hirschfeld’s BNSF and UP in Colorado and Utah   9:30 to 12:30

11 Crew Heimer's Western & Atlantic   9:15 to 2:30 and 6 to 8

 

The following was a description of the layouts written for the NMRA Magazine:

First up will be Jared Harper’s Alma branch of the ATSF. Jared’s John Armstrong designed pike features numerous scratch built structures, a plan that closely follows the original track plan of the branch, and an operating scheme that harkens back to the hey day of the branch’s traffic movement. There will be no 100 car trains pounding the main here, just small steamers going about the business of bringing a prairie branch to life.

Track is code 70 for the main with code 55 used in the sidings and yards.

Digitrax DCC handles the command control duties and in keeping with the prototypical theme, TT&TO will dictate all movements.

Jared is an outstanding modeler and his attention to detail shines thru in the numerous scratch built strutures and bridges.

Next up will be John and Liz Rieken’s HO scale layout depicting terminal operations in the Chicago area near the end of the 1960’s. This layout was designed as a transcontinental operation with Chicago as the hub of activity. When complete, operators will be able to take a Pennsylvania train from Philadelphia into Chicago, hand the transfer consist over to the Belt Railroad of Chicago, leave westbound on the CB&Q, and continue on to the west coast on the Great Northern from St. Paul. The track work on this 40’ x 53’ layout is currently 40% complete with operations taking place on the PRR, BROC and CB&Q. Digitrax DCC is used for Command and Control.

Scenery is 20% complete and the layout can easily accommodate 15 operators.

The next layout in this general area will be Mike Devany’s massive N scale project

Devoted to the C&O in all of it’s coal-hauling glory. Mike's layout is a 40’ x 56’ mushroom-design N-scale layout, closely based on the C&O mainline from Charleston, WV to Russell, KY in 1969.

Highlights include the yard complex at Russell with its two hump yards and the Lineville Bridge over the Ohio River, nearly ten actual feet long. This large layout is designed for operations and utilizes Digitrax for command and control.

Joe Sullivan’s Gainesville & Tennessee subdivision of the L&N is a large N scale multi-deck layout depicting operations between Gainesville, Georgia and Dalton,

Georgia.

Set in the fall of 1979, this proto free-lanced layout fills a 23’x20’ room and a 20’x12’ room in Joe’s basement.

The layout uses Digitrax DCC and is designed for operations.

So far, 2 scale miles of a projected 7.3 miles are operational.

Bench work is modified open grid and the track work is Atlas code 55. Turnouts are #5 and #7 in the yards and #7 and #10 on the mainline.

Less than 5% of the scenery is complete at this time and the maximum grade is 2%.

Mike Deaton’s Colorado Joint Line Railway system is a large multi-deck HO scale layout depicting operations along the Joint Line between Denver and Pueblo, Colorado.

The action takes place between 1972 and 1978.

This layout was started in 2003 and the Golden Spike ceremony took place in 2009. With a 400’ mainline run planned, there will be plenty of opportunity to witness long trains struggling to climb the 2.5% ruling grade.

At this time, there’s no completed scenery so SIG members will have an unobstructed view of the open grid, L girder bench work.

Track work is a combination of Atlas and Peco code 100 for the mainline and code 83 for the yards.

Digitrax is the chosen command control system and there is mainline detection for the planned signal system.

This will be a nice addition to our tour.

Phillip and Linda Stead’s’ D&RGW San Juan Division is a wonderfully executed On3 scale depiction of Colorado narrow gauge railroading.

The layout fills a 1500 square feet room.

The route depicts the operations between Alamosa, Colorado and Chama, New Mexico circa 1949.

So far, 304 feet of mainline track has been completed.

Minimum mainline turnouts are #6 and the minimum radius is 42”.

In keeping with the prototypical nature of the line, the maximum grade will be 4%.

DCC is Digitrax Super Chief.

Mike Paslawskyj’s Delaware, Lackawanna & Western depicts the operations of this bridge line during the late 1950s. Mike models the run from Stroudsburg PA to Scranton PA with pusher grades on both sides of the mountain. Visible mainline will be about 300 feet and the rise to the summit of the grade is approximately 34 inches on a 2.5% grade. Max train length will be thirty 40-foot cars plus power and caboose.

Construction is well under way with the run up to the west slope being complete.

Framing is a combination of traditional open grid and something Mike refers to as “box” framing.

After coming into a large supply of 2”x6” framing, he decided to economize by ripping them down to 2”x3”.    He’s using this 2”x3” framing for his bench work rather than the more common size of 1”x4”.

Sub roadbed is ¾” plywood and the roadbed is homasote from CA Roadbed.

The minimum mainline track radius is 32” and the minimum turnouts are #6, although Mike has used # 8 turnouts where possible on the main.

SIG members will find much to discuss when viewing this layout.
 
Alan Hirschfield is constructing a moderate sized layout in 2 rooms of his basement.

As of today the layout has not been named but construction is well under way.   It focuses on mountain railroading in Colorado and Utah; specifically the BNSF and UP lines.  The time period is from the 90’s to current day.   The bench work is 1”x 2” & 1”x 4” L-girder with cantilevered sections along the walls and braced 2” x 2” legs on the islands and wider sections.  Sub roadbed is mostly ½” plywood with 1” x 4” risers.  With medium sized staging, the railroad will run in two directions with towns and industries along the way.  It is a walk-in, folded dog bone design with a center island and uses through-the-wall tunnels to connect both sides via the mechanical room.
 
At this time, bench work is complete and the homasote sub-roadbed is starting to go down.

Before the cork roadbed and code 100 flex-track goes in, Alan plans to add a masonite backdrop painted blue and stenciled with clouds.  The layout will be controlled via a Digitrax DCC system with power divisions and radio throttle.

 Eventually there will be a fully operational signaling system allowing either manual operation of trains or computer control.  Finalization will be to have a CTC system allowing a dispatch position along with hand held radios for communication.

Larry Daughtry’s Kansas City & Port Arthur railroad is up next.

This HO scale layout depicts the operations of the Kansas City Southern between KC and Port Arthur, Texas.

The railroad occupies a 12’ x 30’ room and a 13’ X 25’ room in the basement of Larry’s home.

The planned 3 levels will be connected by a well-built helix that’s totally operational at this time.

Staging will take up the topmost level while a single track main line with passing sidings will occupy the other two levels.

The layout will have a total of 5 switching yards including Deramus, the major Shreveport yard.

Larry’s current plans include 3 paper mills, 3 electric generating plants with loop unloading, 3 intermodal yards, a port at Port Arthur with facilities for unloading unit grain trains, as well as the refineries located at Beaumont and Port Arthur.

Having worked for the KCS at one time, Larry understands what’s involved in bringing his version of that railroad to life. Members should look forward to this tour.

Dr. Paul Schenk’s hybrid B&O and B&M layout is currently in its 25th year of existence.

After it’s 4th move, the layout is growing into a bigger space.

Dr Schenk models a freelanced version of the B&O and B&M that’s set in the mid 1950s.

A planned mainline run of 75’ will allow for moderate train size.

The scenery is 95% complete on the migrated portion of the layout, while the expansion sections only contain track.

Track work includes code 83 and code 100 flex track, and turnouts are a combination of commercial products and hand laid turnouts where required.

The maximum grade is 3% and Digitrax provides the Command and Control. This layout is at the perfect stage for a visit from the SIG members.

 

Cleveland Convention 2014

The 2014 NMRA and LDSIG Conventions will be held in Cleveland, OH from July 13 through July 19.

Information on the NMRA Convention is available here; information on the LDSIG Convention will be available here.

The major LDSIG activities at the Convention will be the clinics, the Wednesday tour and the banquet.

To get involved, please contact the LDSIG Convention Chair.

 

The schedule for the week includes:

Sunday night meet & greet - 7:00 -10:00

Monday AM Layout Design Bootcamp - 8:00 - Noon

Clinics, Monday afternoon 1:00, 2:30, Tuesday and Thursday 9:00, 10:30, 1:00, 2:30,

Friday 1:00, 2:3- (depending on what they do about clinics during the train show

Wednesday - Annual Business Meeting

Wednesday - Tour all day and  evening 

Friday Night Dinner - at Berea Depot (6:00 -10:00 ???) Bill Neale is the speaker

 

ALL OF THE LDSIG ACTIVITIES ARE OPEN TO ALL CONVENTION ATTENDEES.

We do welcome interested model railroaders not already members of the Layout Design Special Interest Group to join.  Membership information is located on the LDSIG site here. 

 

SIG Room

Meet and Greet, Sunday, July 13, 7-10 PM

We will hold our traditional Meet and Greet in the SIG Room providing an opportunity for all Layout Design and Operations SIG members and friends to introduce themselves and their interests, and find folks who can share ideas and solutions to your layout design and operation concerns.  We have invited owners of the Wednesday Layout Tour to provide a preview of the Tour.  It is also a time to arrange car pools for the Wednesday Layout Tour.  Do not worry about arriving late if your're enjoying tours and op sessions, we will be there until at least 10:00 PM. 

Displays and Consulting 

The SIG Room will be open Monday to Thursday from 8AM to 10PM.  It is a great place to congregate, meet friends, make friends, enjoy the SIG Room Displays, get or give layout design consultation, or generally take a break between clinics or from other convention activities. 

Layout Design Consulting Service  (Monday through Friday - Open to all convention attendees) 

Members of the LDSIG will be offering free half-hour layout design consultation sessions.  Limited availability, sign up in person in the SIG Room during the Convention. 

Help Providers Needed!

Help-provider volunteers are crucially needed.  We need experienced LDSIG members volunteers to provide half-hour layout design help sessions during the Convention.  This offers a service to the hobby and promotes the SIG.  Each volunteer will be asked to set aside one, two or more hours during the Convention when they can commit to being available for help sessions.  It is very important that we have volunteers and hours confirmed before the Convention begins.  To volunteer, or for questions, contact LDJ Editor Byron Henderson, ldjeditor at gmail.dot com, who is coordinating the help sessions.

Clinics 

There will be several Layout Design clinics presented during the convention.  Beyond the Layout Design Bootcamp described immediately following, there are clinics by  Seth Neumann, Tony Koester, Steve Prevette, Bruce Faulkner, Jim Dahlberg, Rodney Black, Ken Cameron, Cal Sexsmith and Doug Geiger.  All the LDSIG clinics, including the Layout Design Bootcamp are open to all Convention Attendees.

Layout Design Bootcamp, Monday, July 14, 2013, 8 to Noon 

Layout Design Journal editor and custom layout designer Byron Henderson and Seth Neuman of the NMRA's Layout Design SIG are leading a Layout Design Bootcamp at the Cleveland 2014 NMRA Convention.



We'll still begin at 8:00 AM Monday, July 14 with LDSIG President Seth Neumann and LDJ Editor Byron Henderson as your friendly presenters.  The Bootcamp is an intensive session on track planning and layout design. Discover how to refine vision, concept, and purpose; select layout footprints and schematics; draw accurate and useful plans; create efficient and engaging yards and industrial areas; make best use of staging tracks; maintain space for people; and avoid common track planning errors. Step-by-step examples from a variety of layout designs will be discussed.

Whether your dream layout is strongly prototype-based, a creative freelanced theme, or somewhere in between, this practical session will give you the tools and best practices to design a great layout!

Among the topics to be covered:

  • Layout design phases: Conceptual, Structural, and Detail
  • Developing vision, theme, and purpose
  • The impact of givens and 'druthers considering space, resources, and skills
  • Prototype research techniques and tools
  • The user and viewer experience
  • Layout footprint techniques
  • Drawing and rendering tools and best practices
  • Planning for people
  • Multi-deck considerations
  • Yard planning
  • Staging design
  • Signature elements vs. typicality
  • LDEs: Possibilities and pitfalls
  • Tricky traps of layout design (common errors to avoid)
  • Layout design for operation 
  •  

… and much, much more!



Other Clinics

Steve Prevette Follow the Water

Steve Prevette TT&TO Basics

Ken Cameron Principles of Dispatching

Seth Neumann Panel: What Would You Do Differently?

Tony Koester MultiDeck Layouts

Jim Dalberg DL&W Passenger Trains

Rodney Black Using CATS to Validate Design for a CTC Layout

Seth Neumann Arduino based CMRI node

Bruce Faulkner Clinchfield Design

Bruce Faulkner Helpful Hints for Hosting Operating Sessions

Cal Sexsmith Helix

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2013, 8-9 AM, LDSIG Annual Meeting 

Wednesday, July 16, 2013, 9:30 AM until 9PM, LDSIG Annual Layout Tour

This year we have gathered another amazing group of layouts for your touring enjoyment.  

Carpooling is strongly encouraged so you can discuss the unique features of these layouts as you travel.  Sign-ups for carpools will be posted in the SIG room.  On the LDSIG tour, one can stay as long as one wishes to study a particularly interesting layout or design element.  The hosts are aware of SIG members' interest and are happy to answer questions.  All this makes the tour an invaluable learning experience.

No lunch is provided so you and your carpool buddies can eat what and when you want (there are plenty of good restaurants in all categories and price ranges along the route). 

The following layouts will be on the Tour.

 Bram Bailey’s Ontario Central Railway  

Cuyhaoga Valley & West Shore Model Railroad Club

 Dave Johnson’s Pennsylvania RR, Pittsburgh Division

 Jim Moore’s Cold Creek & Lake Erie RR

 Dave Lawler’s Canadian National and Ontario Southern

 Dave Hanna's PRR Middle Division

 Tom Businger’s PRR Elmira Branch

 Ken Stroebel’s Kawartha Lakes Railway

 Mike Hauk's Susquehanna & New York Railroad

 Frank Feko's Southern Ohio and Michigan RR

 John Chlebowski's Denver, South Park and Southern

For a map and links to information about each layouts please visit our Wednesday Layout Tour Page.

To purchase tickets for the Wednesday Layout Tour, please go to the NMRA Company Store and click on the 2014 Cleveland LDSIG Layout Tour 

Note: On-line sales of layout tour and banquet tickets are no longer available.  You can still buy tickets at the convention.

 

 LDSIG/OPSIG Banquet Friday July 18,  4PM

This year's banquet will be held at the Berea Union Depot in Berea, Ohio (about 15 miles SW of the convention site).  We will hear from our speaker, MMR Bill Neale.  Bill is a Pennsylvania RR modeler and has been featured in MRP, Great Model Railroads, Model Railroader, and Rail Model Journal.  Tickets for this event will be limited.  

To purchase tickets for the banquet, go to the NMRA Company Store and click on the 2014 Cleveland LDSIG/OPSIG Dinner  button.

 Note: On-line sales of layout tour and banquet tickets are no longer available.  You can still buy tickets at the convention.